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  • FEMA Leads Whole Community Response Efforts For Hurricane Dorian

    • Hurricane Dorian continues advancing north and, this morning, the storm made landfall in the Outer Banks of North Carolina.
    • North Carolina and Virginia are likely to experience continued severe weather with high winds, torrential rain and flash flooding throughout the day.
    • Remember: Stay out of floodwaters – Turn Around, Don’t Drown!
    • If you evacuated, do not try to return home until your local officials say it is safe to return.
    • FEMA is moving resources as the situation changes and remains coordinated with our state and federal partners ready, to respond where needed.

    STAY ALERT AND FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS OF OFFICIALS IN NORTH CAROLINA AND VIRGINIA

    • Mandatory and voluntary evacuation orders remain in effect along the coastal areas and barrier islands of North Carolina and Virginia.
    • There is a risk of tornadoes as Dorian’s bands pass over the region. If a tornado warning is issued in your area, go to a basement or room with no windows. Mobile homes are not a safe place to shelter.
    • Your state and local officials will have the most up-to-date information on evacuation orders, shelter locations and other storm updates.
    • North Carolina:
    • Virginia:
    • All shelters managed by the Red Cross are accessible for people who have disabilities (including those who are deaf, blind, use a wheelchair, or have a service animal).
    • Residents with an acute medical need (a medical need that would require a trip to the hospital) are encouraged to go to a medical shelter for assistance.
    • Visit FEMA.gov/Hurricane-Dorian for additional tips and resources.

    SOUTH CAROLINA RESIDENTS: DON'T RETURN HOME UNTIL IT'S SAFE TO DO SO

    • Even if it looks like the storm has subsided, do not return until told it is safe to do so by local authorities.
    • Flooding remains a concern. Remember: Turn Around, Don’t Drown! Avoid floodwaters as they may contain raw sewage, sharp objects and/or downed power lines.
    • Avoid walking near or driving over downed power lines. Consider all power lines energized and dangerous.
    • Photograph or take video of any damage before you start cleaning up. If your property was damaged, contact your insurance company and file a claim.

    FEMA, FEDERAL AGENCIES REMAIN FOCUSED ON DORIAN

    • More than 7,000 federal responders, including the National Guard, FEMA employees, and our federal partners, nonprofits and private sector, are in place and ready to support.
    • Should the states need any federal support, we stand ready to help.
    • More than 10,000 workers are positioned to restore power in areas affected by Dorian as soon as the storm clears. There are 80 high water vehicles at pre-staged Fort Bragg for water rescue, if needed.
      • The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has deployed personnel including debris clearance staff, route opening engineers and temporary power teams in Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina. The Corps is monitoring water inundation in the Carolinas.
    • The Red Cross is coordinating to support evacuation centers with over 1,900 trained volunteers; more than 5,000 people were in 98 shelters in North and South Carolina.
    • The Salvation Army is providing meals, water and snacks to evacuees and has mobile kitchens on standby.

    DECLARATIONS

    • The governor of Florida requested a major disaster declaration for federal reimbursement to local and state government for emergency protective measures. That request is under review.
    • President Trump approved emergency declarations for Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, including the Catawba Indian Nation, the Seminole Tribe of Florida, and North Carolina, to include the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.
    • The emergency declarations allow for direct federal assistance for emergency and life-safety actions taken.

    USAID ON AID TO THE BAHAMAS

    • We extend condolences to those who have lost loved ones and to the affected communities.
    • Led by USAID, the U.S is providing humanitarian assistance, search & rescue, and other disaster response support at the request of the Bahamian government as well as assisting U.S. citizens in the affected areas.
    • USAID deployed search and rescue members from the Los Angeles County Fire Department and Fairfax County Urban Search and Rescue to The Bahamas. These teams – each comprising 57 people and four canines – will be conducting search and rescue missions, and other critical operations. These teams also have agreements with FEMA as part of the National Urban Search and Rescue system.
    • The U.S. Coast Guard immediately deployed ships and helicopters to evacuate severely injured individuals from Abaco and Grand Bahama islands. U.S. Customs and Border Protection also deployed rotary and fixed wing aircraft to assist with evacuation and relief efforts.
    • USAID is airlifting emergency supplies from Miami to be distributed through the Bahamian government’s National Emergency Management Agency.
    • Visit cidi.org for information on how the public can support relief in the Bahamas.
      Disaster, Survival & Outdoor
      Survival Gear! Wouldn't you like to be a Prepper too? Outdoor, Camping & Hiking Supplies play a big part in Survival Preparedness.... Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car. Get what you need for on the trail or in an emergency. Are you Ready? Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time. Check your Emergency Supplies: Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries) - Count your stock... is it enough? - Don't let your gas tank get below half-full - Keep cash on hand - ATMs may not be available, and you cannot count on credit cards in an emergency. Think Ahead-Plan Wisely-Prepare Yourself to Survive! Survival & Camping Gear Including: Survival Kits, C.E.R.T. Products and gear, Pet Emergency Kits/Supplies, Outdoor Supplies, Triage Units, Trauma Kits, Search & Rescue Equipment & Disaster and Survival Videos, Emergency Shelter & Tents, Lighting, Food & Heating.
  • FEMA Urges Residents in Dorian’s Path to Listen to Local Officials

    “We’re working with federal, state, tribal and local partners but we need people to do their part. Be prepared for what Dorian can do.” – FEMA Acting Administrator Pete Gaynor

     
    September 4, 2019

    • Dorian is bringing life-threatening storm surge and high winds to Florida.  Even without a landfall, there will be impacts and potential for damage along the East Coast.  Areas in Georgia and the Carolinas remain at risk as the storm continues northward.
    • Those who have time to finalize preparations and move to safer areas should do so as advised by state, local, and tribal officials.
    • As the storm passes, the public is advised to stay out of floodwaters – TURN AROUND, DON’T DROWN!.  Residents who evacuated should remain where they are until local officials advise that it is safe to return.
    • FEMA has resources staged throughout the affected areas to provide support to states and tribes, if needed.

    Follow Instructions of Officials in Georgia and the Carolinas:

    • Don’t just focus on the center of the track; high wind, heavy rains and storm surge can bring down trees and knock out power in both inland and coastal areas.
    • Mandatory and voluntary evacuation orders are in effect along the coastal areas of Georgia and the Carolinas.  If you are under voluntary evacuation orders and are in a low-lying area, get out now.
    • All shelters managed by the Red Cross are accessible for people who have disabilities.
    • Medical shelters are open in North and South Carolina for those who need medical care. Medical shelters will open in other areas if needed.
    • Your state and local officials will have the most up-to-date information on evacuation orders and shelter locations:
    • If told to evacuate, evacuate.  Fill your gas tank, know your evacuation zones and routes, and stock your vehicle with emergency supplies for all family members including infants, toddlers and older adults.
    • Visit FEMA.gov/Hurricane-Dorian for additional tips and resources before, during and after the storm.  You can also download the FEMA app (in English or Spanish) for shelters, a checklist of emergency supplies, survival tips and weather alerts.

    Florida Residents, Don’t Return Until It’s Safe to Do So:

    • If you live in Florida and evacuated for Hurricane Dorian, do not return until told it is safe to do so by local authorities.
    • Though some evacuation orders have been lifted, continue to follow local officials’ direction.  Mandatory evacuations remain in effect in some areas as Dorian moves along Florida’s east coast.
    • The potential for flooding from Dorian remains a concern.  Remember: TURN AROUND, DON’T DROWN!  Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters.
    • Check in with your neighbors when it is safe to do so.
    • Photograph or take a video of any damage before you start cleaning up.  If your property was damaged, contact your insurance company and file a claim.
    Dorian is bringing life-threatening storm surge and high winds to Florida.  Even without a landfall, there will be impacts and potential for damage along the East Coast.  Areas in Georgia and the Carolinas remain at risk as the storm continues northward.
    Those who have time to finalize preparations and move to safer areas should do so as advised by state, local, and tribal officials.
    As the storm passes, the public is advised to stay out of floodwaters – TURN AROUND, DON’T DROWN!.  Residents who evacuated should remain where they are until local officials advise that it is safe to return.
    FEMA has resources staged throughout the affected areas to provide support to states and tribes, if needed.

    FEMA and Partners Ready to Support:

    • FEMA is maintaining a robust and flexible posture to support response efforts in multiple states, with staff deployed and ready to respond from Florida to the Carolinas.
    • The response to Dorian includes the whole of government and the whole community.  This is a team effort that includes state, tribal and local governments, private sector partners and non-governmental organizations like The Salvation Army and American Red Cross.
    • FEMA has staging areas throughout the Southeast stocked with food, water and other commodities.  Teams are in place to support local, state and tribal response needs, as requested.
    • The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers positioned debris clearance staff and temporary power teams in FL, GA, SC and NC.
    • The Red Cross is coordinating to support evacuation centers with over 1,900 trained volunteers, 110 response vehicles, and 104 tractor-trailer loads full of supplies.
    • The Salvation Army remains ready with 75 mobile kitchens across the Southeast.

    Declarations:

    • On Tuesday, Sept. 3, President Trump approved North Carolina’s request for an Emergency Declaration allowing direct federal assistance for emergency and life-safety actions taken.  The declaration includes all 100 counties and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians
    • President Trump has also approved Emergency Declarations for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, including the Catawba Indian Nation, and the Seminole Tribe of Florida.

    U.S. Aid to the Bahamas:

    • At the request of the Bahamian government, the United States is providing humanitarian assistance.  USAID has deployed a disaster response team to the Bahamas to lead the federal coordination of the U.S. government’s response on the ground.
    • USAID is airlifting commodities and provided initial funding to meet needs on the ground.
    • The U.S. Coast Guard, in coordination with the Department of State, has a mutual aid agreement with the Bahamas and is assisting with search and rescue missions.
    • The American Red Cross and The Salvation Army are in the Bahamas assisting survivors with emergency sheltering and other immediate needs.
  • What's Your Plan?

    Here at the end of Hurricane Preparedness Week, we'd like to suggest you formalize your reaction plan... think it through, write it down, consider not just hurricanes (and Cyclones and Typhoons) , but related floods, storm surge, evacuation, etc.

    Complete your written hurricane plan:

    The time to prepare for a hurricane is before the season begins, when you have the time and are not under pressure. If you wait until a hurricane is on your doorstep, the odds are that you will be under duress and will make the wrong decisions. Take the time now to write down your hurricane plan. Know where you will ride out the storm and get your supplies now. You don’t want to be standing in long lines when a hurricane warning is issued. Those supplies that you need will probably be sold out by the time you reach the front of the line. Being prepared, before a hurricane threatens, makes you resilient to the hurricane impacts of wind and water. It will mean the difference between your being a hurricane victim and a hurricane survivor.

    Hurricane_Prepare_4-4-16

  • Evacuation Occasion

    Fires and floods cause evacuations most frequently in the U.S. and almost every year, people who live along coastlines evacuate when a hurricane approaches. In some circumstances, local officials decide that hazards are serious and may require a mandatory evacuation. When community evacuations occur, local officials provide information mainly through media sources, although, sirens, text message alerts, emails, and automated telephone calls are also used.

    In addition, many disasters allow little to no time for people to gather basic supplies, so planning ahead is essential. Ready.gov offers tips to prepare your family for evacuation, including:

    • Plan places where your family will meet, both within and outside of your immediate neighborhood. Use the Family Emergency Plan to decide these locations before a disaster;
    • Take your emergency supply kit unless you have reason to believe it has been contaminated;
    • If you have a car, keep a full tank of gas in it if an evacuation seems likely. Keep a half tank of gas in it at all times in case of an unexpected need to evacuate. Gas stations may be closed during emergencies and unable to pump gas during power outages; and
    • If you do not have a car, plan how you will leave if you have to. Make arrangements with family, friends or your local government.
  • Alternate routes for survival

    Prepared on the Road? What if the Road Ain't there?

    Your everyday commute may be interrupted by unexpected events preventing you from making it on time to your destination. Recently, many commuters in Atlanta experienced challenges getting home and had to stay put due to the winter storm. This is just one event that raised the question, “what do I need if I have to unexpectedly shelter-in-place?”

    Maybe it’s not weather that will affect your commute, but a traffic accident that might cause some delay in your day. The best plan is to save time by planning ahead:

    • Download and Explore Ready.gov’s Commuter Emergency Plan;
    • Prepare a preparedness kit for your car;
    • Establish a communication plan to contact loves ones;
    • Download your local transit app; or
    • Have cash and coins handy for transit fare boxes or to purchase goods.

    Remember the time to plan is now, not later! Visit ready.gov for a list of ways to be prepared for natural disasters. You can also share preparedness tips and thoughts using #PrepareAthon on Twitter or via discussion forums on the National Preparedness Community.

    image of yellow Aluminum Sport Utility Shovel Aluminum Sport Utility Shovels that come apart into small pieces for convenient storage
    Auto Emergency Accessories - From Tire Gauges and emergency tire inflator kits to Emergency Reflecting Triangles, Fix-A-Flat & emergency Escape Window Punch, We have auto Emergency Strobes, Battery Jumper Cables & Traffic Cones. We even have emergency Travel Blankets to stay warm in a roadside emergency.
    Roadside Emergency Kits for the Unexpected - Auto Survival Kits... From our AAA Severe Weather Road Kit to the Economy Road Warrior Kit, we offer a broad selection of Auto Emergency Kits like the Urban Warrior Kit, Mountain Road Warrior Kit & High Visibility Incident Unit.
  • Wildfires in the West...

    Here we go again - wildfire season.

    Red Flag Alerts are out, Santa Ana Winds are blowing, People are worried.

    WilfireSDHere at First Aid Store, we are reminded of the wildfires this time of year in 2007. We had just moved into our new Corporate Distribution Hub in Encinitas, and were isolated, with all communities North, South and East evacuated. (There is only the Beautiful Blue Pacific to our West, and they didn't evacuate any fish.)

    WildfireSD-2Here we were - 1/2 our staff unable to make it in, the rest ready for flight if the call came... but we were working on something else.

    What were we doing? We packed and shipped two truckloads of first aid supplies, masks (Smoke and ash issues) and sanitary needs to the American Red Cross, while simultaneously donating and supplying similar items to our local Senior and Community Centers and evacuation points.

    We believe in preparedness (we're having a rush as you would expect on our Evacuation and Fire supplies right now) but we also believe in community. We've been supporting charitable efforts, participating in CERT, and contributing to the national community through education and good service for 21 years now. We hope you are, too.

    Read about Wildfire Preparedness & Learn how to Prepare your Family for Wild Fire

    Read about the Fires mentioned above:
    Continue reading

  • Be ready for Wildfires!

    Are you ready for Wildfire and Evacuation?

    Windows/Vents - Close all windows, doors, vents, blinds before evacuating.
    Flame/Smoke - Smoke from wildfires is a mixture of gases and fine particles. Smoke can hurt your eyes, irritate your respiratory system, and worsen chronic heart and lung  diseases.
    Listen and watch for air quality reports and health warnings about smoke. You can suffer from smoke even if you are not in the direct path of the wildfire.
    Radio - Stay tuned to local radio or television station for information and instructions from local officials.
    IF ADVISED TO EVACUATE DO SO IMMEDIATELY
    Escape Route - Have several planned escape routes away from your home--by car or foot.
    Smoke Detector - Install a dual-sensor smoke alarm on each level of your home. Test
    monthly and change the batteries at least once each year
    Go-Kit - Have a disaster supply kit ready to take with you.
    Be Ready for Wildfires! Click to download full size .pdf file Be Ready for Wildfires! Click to download full size .pdf file
  • Fire! Are you prepared for Wildfire Season?

    We've had serious Heatwaves for several years in a row now - and all that hot dry weather also leads to Wildfire Danger... Are you ready? At Work? At Home? For Evacuation? For Fire?

    Wildfires are common disasters that can spread quickly, particularly during dry conditions. Learning about wildfire risks and planning in advance can help protect against the destructive impacts of wildfires. This page is designed to help workers and employers prepare for a wildfire and to protect themselves in the wildfire’s aftermath. (Leer en Español)

    Wildfire Safety - Plan & Be Ready Wildfire Safety - Plan & Be Ready

    The Preparedness page provides information on evacuation plans, safety zones around buildings, and equipment to have on hand in case a wildfire occurs. Preparing plans in advance can help workers get to safety before a wildfire impacts an area and can also help protect personal property.

    The Response/Recovery page details hazards that may be present in areas affected by wildfires. These include safety hazards, such as unstable structures; heavy equipment and slips, trips, and falls, as well as health hazards such as heat stress, hazardous materials, carbon monoxide and other respiratory hazards.

    Employer Responsibilities

    Each employer is responsible for the safety and health of its workers and for providing a safe and healthful workplace for its workers. Employers are required to protect workers from the anticipated hazards associated with the response and recovery operations for wildfires that workers are likely to conduct. For additional information on Workers' Rights, Employer Responsibilities, and other services OSHA offers, visit OSHA’s Compliance Assistance Page, Workers Page and Publications.

    Additional Information

     

    Burn First Aid & Fire Safety Burn First Aid & Fire Safety 

     

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