Online 24/7+Friendly Toll Free Service
6-6 Pacific/9-9 Eastern (Monday-Friday)

electrical safety

  • Electrical Grounding Safety

    Grounding is required in all electrical systems. Electricity must have a complete pathway, from the source through a circuit and back to the ground of the source, in order to operate correctly. Without a solid ground, electrical systems and equipment will malfunction.

    The nature of electricity is that it seeks a pathway to ground. It will also take the path of least resistance. If the grounding system in a business or home presents resistance due to poor connections, electricity will find an easier path. Unfortunately, this path will often be through the nearest object or person that is grounded.

    Grounding Basics
    Ground rods are used to complete the circuit connection to ground. Electrical systems supply power to circuits through one or more hot wires. The neutral in the circuit provides one return pathway to complete the circuit. The ground connection provides an additional path for power to travel safely to ground in case of shorts or other problems in

    Electricity is all around us. It lights up our homes... powers much of the machinery and equipment that we use... and runs many of our tools. We are so used to it, most employees "take it for granted." Yet electricity can also be dangerous. Employees need to know how electricity works, and what they should do to protect themselves from its hazards. Our training products on "Electrical Safety" remind employees about electrical hazards they may face in their jobs, and provides the information they need to work safely around electricity. This program will also assist in satisfying the OSHA training requirements under 29 CFR Part 1910.331 (Electrical Safety Standard) for "non-qualified" employees. Topics covered in these products include:     How electricity works.     Fuses and circuit breakers.     Grounding and GFIs.     Safe work practices.     Outlets, plugs and extension cords.     Working with electrical equipment.     Using ladders around electricity.     Electrical emergencies.     and more. Electricity is all around us. It lights up our homes... powers much of the machinery and equipment that we use... and runs many of our tools. We are so used to it, most employees "take it for granted." Yet electricity can also be dangerous. Employees need to know how electricity works, and what they should do to protect themselves from its hazards.
    Our training products on "Electrical Safety" remind employees about electrical hazards they may face in their jobs, and provides the information they need to work safely around electricity. This program will also assist in satisfying the OSHA training requirements under 29 CFR Part 1910.331 (Electrical Safety Standard) for "non-qualified" employees. Topics covered in these products include:
    - How electricity works.
    - Fuses and circuit breakers.
    - Grounding and GFIs.
    - Safe work practices.
    - Outlets, plugs and extension cords.
    - Working with electrical equipment.
    - Using ladders around electricity.
    - Electrical emergencies.
    ...and more.

    the system. This is designed to be the path of least resistance.
    Ground rods must be present and properly connected or bonded to the electrical system. A ground rod may be visible, but not actually connected to anything or not connected correctly. In commercial and industrial applications, the ground cable should be CAD welded to provide a continuous bond, especially if it is buried underground.

    The diameter of the wire or cable used to create the ground is an important factor is the strength of the connection. The larger the diameter, the better it will have the ability to conduct less resistance there is to ground. Connections must be made securely; paint, rust or insulation on metal or wires will interfere with the conductivity.

    In residential applications, many homes used the plumbing system to establish a ground connection. Ground wires were attached to the metal plumbing. While this system can still be used, a ground rod is now required. In residential applications where non-metallic plumbing is used, two ground rods are often required.
    In addition to ensuring that the ground connections are solid, no voltage, or very little, should be recorded on the ground plane. If voltage is present, there is a malfunction in the system.

    Ground Fault Protection
    Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) devices are designed to shut off circuits when the system detects an interruption in the normal ground. GFCI protection is required for all locations that present a wet use hazard. In homes, this includes kitchens, bathrooms and laundry facilities. Outdoor receptacles must also be protected.

    GFCI protection is available through the use of specifically designed receptacles, which protect devices in a line, or circuit breakers that protect an entire circuit. GFCI cord protection devices are also available for portable protection. These systems should be tested on a monthly basis.

    Lightning Protection
    Lightning protection systems provide another form of protection for homes and facilities. The NEC and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) have specific guidelines that include the depth and size of the rod and the compatibility of the rod and connections.

    The National Electrical Code (NEC) establishes the size of the rod required for electrical installations. Code requirements include the number of rods and how the connections are made. In high-voltage applications, even the earth itself should be inspected, as soil content will affect resistance.

    While users can test GFCI receptacles, inspecting the safety of a facility’s grounding should be handled by professionals. Equipment is required to fully test the resistance to ground and make sure that a sufficient ground plane is available to handle the amount of power in the facility.

    Read more about lightning safety:

    Bob Sheppard is the Founder, President, and General Manager of Southwest Energy Systems; a NETA (InterNational Electrical Testing Association) accredited testing and engineering firm based primarily out of Phoenix, Arizona. He has been helping to expand, shape, develop and refine the standards and best practices of the constantly evolving industry for over a decade. Bob is an active participant within the NETA organization and was recently appointed to the Board of Directors. He has also been actively involved with (International Association of Electrical Inspectors)IAEA and many other standards developing committees.

    Bob graduated from Idaho State University with a technical degree in power generation with a heavy emphasis on power distribution and emergency systems. Bob has held positions within various system reliability companies including Electrical Reliability Services (Emerson) and Electric Power Systems, as well as power generation companies such as Kohler Power Systems, Empire Southwest (Caterpillar) and Cummins.

    Get a Quote for a Class:
    Electrical Safety Live Instruction Training Courses at YOUR Location

  • Electrical Safety in Your Industrial Facility

    Electrocution is one of the leading causes of workplace fatalities in industrial settings — just behind falls and being struck by an object. Part of the reason is that when it comes to electricity, nothing is minor. You might walk away from a fall or even a burn, but electric shock will stop you in your tracks and almost always requires serious medical attention. And because workplaces are so accustomed to being surrounded by electrical equipment, workers tend to grow complacent and careless. Without regular training, they might not spot such obvious risks as kinked cords, exposed wires or overloaded electrical panels.

    To keep your workers safe, you must understand the risks, know what to look for and, if all else fails, know how to respond to an emergency. Below are a few tips for keeping your industrial facility safe.

    Know the Risks

    While all electricity has its risks, they aren’t all the same. You and your team should understand the different types and levels of electrical currents. If you know the risks, you can respond accordingly in the event of an emergency.

    - What kind of current are you working with? Know that alternating currents (AC) are generally seen as more dangerous than direct currents (DC), as the fluctuations can cause the victim’s heart to fibrillate. By comparison, DC is more likely to “freeze” the victim in place, but the victim is more likely to recover if treated with a defibrillating device right away. Regardless of the type of current, medical attention should be sought immediately.
    - What is the level of voltage? The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) says that 50 volts — while considered low voltage — poses a significant risk for electrocution. OSHA requires that any workers that come in contact with voltage that high receive special safety training (note that electricians are required to receive the training regardless). High voltage is higher than 600 volts. Less than 50 volts is not considered critically dangerous and is not regulated under the same safety standards.

    Check Your Equipment and Supplies

     

    OSHA Handbooks & DVDs for OSHA Construction Regulations, OSHA Dictionary & General Industry Regulations (Bilingual). OSHA Compliance Kits, Books, CDs: OSHA 1910 General Industry & OSHA 1926 Construction Industry Including OSHA Log Books, Update Services & Regulations - Federal OSHA 29 / CFR Standards - Helping you protect workers and stay compliant with OSHA mandates. OSHA Compliance Kit OSHA 1910 General Industry OSHA 1926 Construction Industry OSHA llog books OSHA Handbooks & DVDs for OSHA Construction Regulations, OSHA Dictionary & General Industry Regulations (Bilingual). OSHA Compliance Kits, Books, CDs: OSHA 1910 General Industry & OSHA 1926 Construction Industry Including OSHA Log Books, Update Services & Regulations - Federal OSHA 29 / CFR Standards - Helping you protect workers and stay compliant with OSHA mandates. OSHA Compliance Kit OSHA 1910 General Industry OSHA 1926 Construction Industry OSHA llog books

    OSHA provides thorough safety procedures related to preventing electrocution, including recommendations for checking your equipment before use. A few examples include the following:

    - Inspect electrical equipment frequently. Inspections should be scheduled at regular intervals and should be thorough. Have your employees look at all equipment on a daily basis at the start and end of each work day.
    - Inspect the cords of all portable equipment, as they can be exposed to more frequent strains than stationary equipment.
    - Be sure all breakers and switches are marked so they can be shut down easily.
    - Provide flame retardant clothing and electrical gloves for employees who regularly work in high-risk settings.
    - Don’t take shortcuts. If one area in your facility does not have easy access to electrical outlets, have them installed instead of relying on extension cords.
    - Be sure all electrical equipment in your facility is properly grounded using ground fault circuit interrupters.

    Know Safety Procedures

    Your workers should know what to look for, and they should be prepared to address any issues. Your job is to give them the resources and training they need.

    - Make sure your employees are well educated about the risks. They should know how to spot potential safety hazards such as damaged cords or unsafe wire placement (areas of high traffic, for example). They should also know how to respond by reporting the hazard and moving people out of the vicinity.
    - Have someone onsite who is trained in CPR and first aid.
    - Post electrical safety guidelines throughout the facility.
    - Identify high-risk areas and secure them so that only qualified personnel may access them.
    - Properly label danger zones. Your workers should know where the high-voltage spots are, and they should be able to identify AC vs. DC currents at a quick glance.
    - Know the symptoms of malfunctioning equipment. The problem can be electrical and might go unnoticed between inspections. If you recognize the sights, sounds and smells of bad electrical equipment, you can respond much more quickly and prevent workplace accidents.

    Extra Steps

    Our training products on "Electrical Safety" remind employees about electrical hazards they may face in their jobs, and provides the information they need to work safely around electricity. This program will also assist in satisfying the OSHA training requirements under 29 CFR Part 1910.331 (Electrical Safety Standard) for "non-qualified" employees. Our training products on "Electrical Safety" remind employees about electrical hazards they may face in their jobs, and provides the information they need to work safely around electricity. This program will also assist in satisfying the OSHA training requirements under 29 CFR Part 1910.331 (Electrical Safety Standard) for "non-qualified" employees.

    It’s worth going beyond the routine to ensure a safe work environment. Here a few extra steps that can significantly reduce the risk of workplace injury.

    - Use a “lockout/tagout” system on heavy machinery. This can prevent electrocution occurring while someone is performing machine maintenance. These systems physically prevent any electricity from flowing while the machine is being serviced.
    - Use locked cabinets and enclosures to protect electrical wiring from tampering or accidental exposure.
    - When power cords are needed, use ones that are flexible so that the risk of abrasion is reduced.

    If you and your workers understand the risk of electrocution, your work place will be safer. Take the precautions listed above, and always remember just how serious electric shock can be.

    Author Bio:

    Article written by John J Pempek Inc. Chicago's complete turnkey electrical contracting solution, offering commercial and industrial electrical contracting services since 1947

    Electricity is all around us. It lights up our homes... powers much of the machinery and equipment that we use... and runs many of our tools. We are so used to it, most employees "take it for granted." Yet electricity can also be dangerous. Employees need to know how electricity works, and what they should do to protect themselves from its hazards.

    Our training products on "Electrical Safety" remind employees about electrical hazards they may face in their jobs, and provides the information they need to work safely around electricity. This program will also assist in satisfying the OSHA training requirements under 29 CFR Part 1910.331 (Electrical Safety Standard) for "non-qualified" employees. Topics covered in these products include:

    • How electricity works.
    • Fuses and circuit breakers.
    • Grounding and GFIs.
    • Safe work practices.
    • Outlets, plugs and extension cords.
    • Working with electrical equipment.
    • Using ladders around electricity.
    • Electrical emergencies.
    • and more.

    Get a Quote for a Class:
    Electrical Safety Live Instruction Training Courses at YOUR Location

  • Staying Safe at Home This Christmas

    Now that we've conquered Thanksgiving and Black Friday, let's begin thinking about...

    Staying Safe at Home This Christmas

    It doesn’t seem long ago that we were all jetting off on our summer holidays but, Christmas is quickly approaching. Christmas is a wonderful time of the year, full of traditions – where friends and families gather together, eat lots of delicious food and get wrapped up in the Christmas spirit.  A big part of getting in to the festive spirit is filling the house with Christmas decorations, whether it’s a Christmas tree, some not so tasteful tinsel or endless strings of fairy lights. However, the cheerfulness that holiday decorations can bring to a home can cause many people to overlook just how dangerous they can be.

    According to NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) decorative lights are involved in 160 reported home structure fires every year with Christmas trees accounting for an additional 230 fires each year. Fires from Christmas decorations cause on average 13 deaths and 34 injuries per year as well as millions of pounds worth of property damage. This is the type of Christmas that no wants to remember, and it’s important that everyone includes safety as part of their holiday traditions.

    Staying safe with electrics during the festive holiday season doesn’t have to mean going out of your way to get the best electrical test equipment. The ESFI (electrical Safety Foundation) has launched “Deck the Halls safely for All” campaign which educates people on safe decorating practices and provides important tips on avoiding electrical hazards that are common during this time of year.  The campaign provides people with step to step tips for decorating homes safely from purchasing, assembling and preserving as well as in-depth advice with heating equipment, holiday lighting and cord safety. What’s more, the guide discusses Tamper Resistant Receptacles and Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters safety devices to avoid any property damage, electrical injuries or even worse death.

    It’s important to give your home a regular electrical check-up - it doesn’t take long and can make the difference of ensuring you and your loved ones remain safe in your home. Here are just a few aspects to consider:

    Switches and outlets – question whether: they work properly, they are warm to touch, discoloured, making any unusual noises, and plugs fit securely.  If your switches and outlets experience any of these problems, it is vital to get them checked out by a licenced electrician.

    Cords or wires – question whether: they are cracked or frayed, placed under rigs or carpets, wrapped up while in use and pinched by furniture or doors/windows. Avoid using any cables in this way and replace them as soon as you identify any kind of damage.

    Lamps and appliances – question whether: your light fixtures have the correct wattage and if appliance cords are kept clear of hot surfaces. If the bulb wattage is above the recommended for your lamp, it could result in a fire.

    To educate the younger generation about the dangers of electricity during the festive period in an entertaining way, The Electrical Safety Foundation have included animated videos and games, so making the process Christmas safety learning fun and rewarding for children.

    Staying safe with electrics at Christmas time isn’t difficult and if everyone complies with basic electrical safety principles, and consciously tries to incorporate safety into their Christmas traditions, then the reported house fires, injuries and deaths will decrease further, giving everyone the Christmas they want to remember.

    Learn more about Winter Safety including:

    - Christmas trees (selecting, transporting and setting up).
    - Using "string lights".
    - Safe use of extension cords and outlets.
    - Fires, fireplaces and chimneys.
    - Using candles.
    - Fire extinguishers and fire escapes.
    - Dressing for cold weather.
    - Working in the cold.
    - Walking and driving in ice and snow.
    - and more.

    Special Offers, While Supplies Last, Clearance, Seasonal, Short Dated + Other Deals... Great Deals on Closeouts and Special Purchase or other "Special Circumstance" products! Deep Discounts on Great Quality... New, Unopened, Unused First Aid Items on SALE...nothing expired, all first quality...we're just clearing them out~ We even have items featured in our FREE First Aid Video Online! Special Offers, While Supplies Last, Clearance, Seasonal, Short Dated + Other Deals... Great Deals on Closeouts and Special Purchase or other "Special Circumstance" products! Deep Discounts on Great Quality... New, Unopened, Unused First Aid Items on SALE...nothing expired, all first quality...we're just clearing them out~ We even have items featured in our FREE First Aid Video Online!

3 Item(s)