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driving safety

  • Driving In The Dark on Halloween

    A majority of motor vehicle accidents happen after dark, even though we drive less at night than in the daytime. That being said think about Halloween evening when kids are running rampant. We'd like to share with you some safe driving tips but also protect yourself & family from drivers by ordering some glowsticks, flashlights, and reflective safety vests before Halloween.

    The long evenings can put us at greater risk for fatal crashes this Autumn, as many of us commute both to and from work in the dark. In addition, our after-work errands, sports, and other activities put us out in the traffic in the dark.

    Here are Some Tips to Protect You and Your Family In the Dark:
    • Head to work early so you don't have to speed. Besides the darkness, there may be the problem of frost to remove from the windshield.
    • Check your driving lights and signal lights regularly to make sure they are working and clear of obstructions.
    • Turn your headlights on as soon as the light begins to get dim.
    • Use your low beams when you are following another vehicle or when a vehicle approaches from the opposite direction. When you blind the other driver with your high beams, you are endangering yourself.
    • Look beyond your own headlights. Use streetlights and the lights of vehicles in front of you to get an idea of what is happening down the road.
    • Leave an extra space around your vehicle at night, to allow more reaction time for yourself and other drivers.
    • Pay attention to warnings of animal crossings. Animals are most likely to be active around roads in the early morning and early evening.
    • Drunk drivers are a danger to everyone on the road. Statistics suggest that one out of 13 drivers is drunk in the early morning hours, so give others plenty of space to maneuver.
    • During a car problem where you have to pull over on the road, pull as far off the road as you can. Warn other drivers with your four-way flashers, headlights, interior lights and flares if you have them.

    READ MORE
    Halloween Safety Review
    Halloween is Dark and Scary
    Protect your Pets Halloween Weekend

  • Number of crash deaths on US roads

    The Prevention Status Reports from the CDC highlight—for all 50 states and the District of Columbia—the status of public health policies and practices designed to address 10 important public health problems and concerns. The following policies are recommended by the Community Preventive Services Task Force and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration because scientific studies support their effectiveness in preventing or reducing crash-related injuries and deaths:

    • Auto - Did you knowImplementing primary enforcement seat belt laws that cover occupants in all seating positions
    • Mandating the use of car seats and booster seats for motor vehicle passengers through at least age 8 years
    • Implementing comprehensive graduated driver licensing (GDL) systems, which help new drivers gain experience under low-risk conditions by granting driving privileges in stages. Research shows that more comprehensive GDL systems prevent more crashes and deaths than less comprehensive GDL systems. Components of comprehensive GDL systems include
      • A minimum age of 16 years for learner’s permits
      • A mandatory holding period of at least 12 months for learner’s permits
      • Nighttime driving restrictions between 10:00 pm and 5:00 am (or longer) for intermediate or provisional license holders
      • A limit of zero or one young passengers who can ride with intermediate or provisional license holders without adult supervision
      • A minimum age of 18 years for unrestricted licensure
    • Requiring the use of ignition interlock devices for everyone convicted of alcohol-impaired driving

    Other strategies recommended by scientific evidence for preventing motor vehicle injuries include enhanced seat belt enforcement campaigns, 0.08% blood alcohol concentration laws, minimum legal drinking age laws, publicized sobriety checkpoint programs, alcohol-impaired driving mass media campaigns, increased alcohol taxes, car and booster seat distribution plus education campaigns, and community-wide car seat and booster seat information and enhanced enforcement campaigns.

    Seat belt law

    A primary enforcement seat belt law allows police to stop a vehicle solely because a driver or passenger is not wearing a seat belt. A secondary enforcement seat belt law requires police to have another reason for stopping a vehicle before citing a driver or passenger for not buckling up. The most comprehensive policies are primary seat belt laws that cover all occupants, regardless of where they are sitting.

    Bar chart showing the number of states rated green, yellow, and red for seat belt law in the 2013 PSRs and 2015 PSRs, along with a table showing the rating scale. In 2013, of states with available data, 18 states rated green, 16 states rated yellow, and 17 states rated red. In 2015, of states with available data, 19 states rated green, 16 states rated yellow, and 16 states rated red. Green means their was a primary enforcement law covering all seating positions. Yellow means there was a primary enforcement law covering only the front seats. Red means their was a secondary enforcement law or no law. States with missing data are not included. (State count includes the District of Columbia.)

    How These Ratings Were Determined
    These ratings reflect the extent to which states’ seat belt laws allowed for primary enforcement and covered all seating positions. Ratings are based on data collected from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) on July 1, 2015, and therefore reflect IIHS’s interpretation of each state’s policy at that time (20). The “as of” date referenced in the Motor Vehicle Injuries state reports—July 1, 2015—is the date CDC assessed the policy. The date does not reflect when the law was enacted or became effective.

    Driving Safety

    Driving Safety First Aid Store offers training products on Driving Safety to provide the information employees need to drive cars, vans and small trucks safely, both on and off the job. Topics covered in these products include: Inspecting the vehicle, Adjusting seats, mirrors and other equipment, Mental preparation and concentration, Passing another vehicle, Sharing the road with trucks and buses, School bus encounters, Driving at night, Adverse weather conditions, skidding and hydroplaning, Distracted driving, Road rage, What to do in case of an accident.

    First Aid Store offers training products on Driving Safety to provide the information employees need to drive cars, vans and small trucks safely, both on and off the job. Topics covered in these products include: Inspecting the vehicle, Adjusting seats, mirrors and other equipment, Mental preparation and concentration, Passing another vehicle, Sharing the road with trucks and buses, School bus encounters, Driving at night, Adverse weather conditions, skidding and hydroplaning, Distracted driving, Road rage, What to do in case of an accident.

    • About 90 people die each day from motor vehicle crashes on US roads, according to the latest CDC Vital Signs.
    • The US crash death rate is more than twice the average of 19 other high-income countries.
    • States can implement proven policies and strategies to prevent thousands of crash-related injuries and deaths.

    Auto & Roadside Survival Kits

    AA01Roadside Emergency Kits for the Unexpected - Auto Survival Kits... From our AAA Severe Weather Road Kit to the Economy Road Warrior Kit, we offer a broad selection of Auto Emergency Kits like the Urban Warrior Kit, Mountain Road Warrior Kit & High Visibility Incident Unit.

    First Aid Store offers Name Brand Auto First Aid Kits - Car, Auto, Vehicle and Truck First Aid Kits. First Aid Only, AAA, American Red Cross, Genuine First Aid, North, and Lifeline Auto First Aid and Roadside Emergency Kits.

  • Hold Onto Your Seat – Some Seat Belt ‘Myth-Conceptions’

    Seat Belts... lifesavers.

    Driving-Seat_Belt-3MYTH: My seat belt will trap me in the car if the car catches fire or goes underwater.
    FACT: Only about one-half of one percent of accidents involve car fires or water. But even if
    you did have such an accident, wearing a seat belt makes it more likely that you would remain
    conscious—and able to get out of the car.

    MYTH: If I'm not wearing a seat belt, I'll be more likely to be thrown clear in an accident.
    FACT: You are more likely to be thrown out of the car if you're not wearing a seat belt. But that's not a plus. You're 25 times more likely to be killed if you're thrown out of the vehicle. You'll probably be thrown through the windshield or door and into traffic or a tree.

    Driving-Seat_Belt-1MYTH: I have automatic shoulder belts in my car, so I don't need to use a lap belt.
    FACT: The combination of lap and a shoulder belt will keep you safer. Use them together.
    The lap belt will keep you in place so the shoulder belt can restrain you properly.

    Driving-Seat_Belt-2MYTH: My car has air bags, so I don't need to wear a seat belt.
    FACT: Air bags provide valuable protection, but they're not meant to be used alone. For one thing, they only inflate in a head-on collision. To be safe in a rear or side crash, you need both a lap and a shoulder belt. You also have to wear a seat belt to stay in position and get the safety benefits of an air bag in a head-on crash.

    MYTH: I'm just going a short distance. I don't need my belt.
    FACT: There are more crashes—and more fatal crashes—on local roads than on highways. No trip is too short to be dangerous!

    Read more: Search driving Driving Tips To Keep Your Business SafeSobering Facts about Drunk DrivingDriving Safety and Preventable Death: 9 Lifesaving Resources

    AAA-KirAuto & Roadside Survival Kits  

    Auto First Aid and Car Safety Supply: Roadside Emergency Kits for the Unexpected - Auto Survival Kits... From our AAA Severe Weather Road Kit to the Economy Road Warrior Kit, we offer a broad selection of Auto Emergency Kits like the Urban Warrior Kit, Mountain Road Warrior Kit & High Visibility Incident Unit.

  • Driving Tips To Keep Your Business Safe

    DrivingWhether your drivers are delivering products to your customers, getting service providers where they need to go or traveling for marketing purposes, having employees driving for your company automatically increases your risk exposure. Teaching drivers to be safe on the road, and taking measures on your end to increase driver safety, will help lessen that risk and improve your image with customers and the public. Here are some tips to help make driver safety a priority for your company.

    Keep Up With Vehicle Maintenance

    An unmaintained vehicle is an unsafe vehicle. Keep your vehicles well maintained, and they will serve your drivers more reliably. Keeping all systems on the vehicle properly maintained will prevent accidents that occur because a system or component fails while the driver is on the road. When maintaining vehicles, don't neglect the tires. Sufficient tread and tire pressure can help prevent a number of accidents.

    Insist on Safe Driving Practices

    Driving Safety First Aid Store offers training products on Driving Safety to provide the information employees need to drive cars, vans and small trucks safely, both on and off the job. Topics covered in these products include: Inspecting the vehicle, Adjusting seats, mirrors and other equipment, Mental preparation and concentration, Passing another vehicle, Sharing the road with trucks and buses, School bus encounters, Driving at night, Adverse weather conditions, skidding and hydroplaning, Distracted driving, Road rage, What to do in case of an accident. Driving Safety
    First Aid Store offers training products on Driving Safety to provide the information employees need to drive cars, vans and small trucks safely, both on and off the job. Topics covered in these products include: Inspecting the vehicle, Adjusting seats, mirrors and other equipment, Mental preparation and concentration, Passing another vehicle, Sharing the road with trucks and buses, School bus encounters, Driving at night, Adverse weather conditions, skidding and hydroplaning, Distracted driving, Road rage, What to do in case of an accident.

    Make safe driving practices an essential part of your business operations. Common safe driving practices of which you may need to instruct your drivers include:

    • Driving at a safe distance. Two to three seconds behind the car in front is necessary, especially for large trucks that are heavier than most cars.
    • Use a safe rate of speed. Speeding is a major risk, contributing to 45 percent of fatality crashes and nearly two-thirds of injury crashes, so teach your drivers to honor the speed limits.
    • Pull over when needed. Whether messing with a GPS or changing media on an on-board entertainment system, pull over when your eyes can't be on the road.

    Teach these safety tips to your drivers, and then expect your drivers to follow them.

    Use Technology to Help

    Vehicle technology is constantly changing, and many of those changes benefit driver safety. Modern antilock braking systems, for instance, keep wheels from locking when braking quickly. Electronic stability control systems allow for individual wheels to brake separately when the vehicle starts to spin out of control. Weather alert systems can provide drivers details about upcoming weather that could impact the safety of their trip.

    Technology that comes with the vehicle is your first line of defense. You can also install GPS fleet tracking systems to keep tabs on driver behavior and location, and thus improve safety even more.

    Monitor the Weather

    The weather can change your driving tactics, as weather conditions can quickly turn a safe road into a slippery hazard. According to the National Safety Council, most drivers need a three-second following distance for normal driving conditions — that needs to increase when rain, fog, snow, smoke or ice are present. Reduce speed so you have enough time to stop when weather is a factor.

    WEA – Wireless Emergency Alerts

    Drivers may not be aware of all of the risks of weather, so you may need to provide some education. Specifically, many drivers are unaware that the most dangerous period during rain is when the road first gets wet — not after the road is soaked. New moisture causes oil on the road to “float,” creating a slick surface that increases the chances of hydroplaning. Teaching drivers about these risks will help them reduce speed and stay a safe distance from other vehicles when conditions warrant.

    Your drivers are the first face of your company that many customers and potential customers will see. Driver safety is paramount to your company's success. Not only does it make a good impression, but it also lowers your company’s financial risk — so spend some time teaching your drivers how to be safe on the road.

    Author bio: Robert J. Hall is president of Track Your Truck, a leader in GPS vehicle tracking device and software for small and midsized companies.

  • Watch out for Bunnies and Others on the Road

    This weekend, many will be traveling to spend time with family, have outings with children, and "celebrate".

    While Easter is not a holiday typically known as a "party weekend", people, do, nevertheless, imbibe. What is different about Easter is that often the drinking occurs earlier in the day... while typically you can judge the "odds" of other drivers being under the influence by the time of day (or rather night) - on Easter, you should consider that many may be having a liquid brunch as well.

    Here are some other tips for road safety this weekend:

    Auto-EmergencyRoad Safety: Keeping Safe & Secure

    Driving Safety and Preventable Death: 9 Lifesaving Resources

    Remember Road Fatalities

    Driving During Thunderstorms

    Sobering Facts about Drunk Driving

    DOT Chart showing typical alcohol impaired driving by hour:Drinking-by-the-hour

  • Sobering Facts about Drunk Driving

    Alcohol is by far the world’s most popular intoxicant, and while its health risks are more or less common knowledge, the popularity of alcohol is decidedly unwavering. While there may arguably be situations where liquid courage can be an asset, driving is most definitely not one. One of the first things to go when consuming alcohol is good judgment, and when this is absent in a driving situation, chaos ensues. Roughly 32% of fatal car accidents occur as a direct result of a driver under the influence of alcohol making bad choices. This may include not buckling, reckless speeding or dozing off at the wheel.

    The Stats
    Looking at drunk driving statistics is indeed a sobering experience, and the numbers tell a disturbing story of avoidable and needles deaths. Almost 13.000 people are killed in alcohol related car crashes every year, and many thousand are injured. Extrapolating these numbers leads us to the shocking fact that a person is injured or killed in a drunk driving crash every two minutes (http://www.madd.org/drunk-driving/about/drunk-driving-statistics.html). Drunk driving is, in most cases, not a one-off occurrence. On the contrary, the average drunk driver have driven drunk eighty times before his or her first arrest. During a survey in 2012, 29.1 million people admitted to have driven while drunk. That is more than the population of Australia. Night time is the most dangerous, as drunk driving accidents occur 4.5 times more frequently at night than during the day. According to the statistics, young people are most at risk, as one out of three people involved in fatal drunk driving accidents are between 21 and 24 years of age.MADD

    BAC
    BAC, or blood alcohol content, is the most credible measure of ones level of intoxication. Put simply, it is the percentage of alcohol in a person’s blood. So a BAC of 0.10% indicates that one tenth of a percent of a person’s blood is alcohol. Australian law permits a legal limit of 0.05 BAC, and 0 BAC for probationary license holders and learners. An important question to ask yourself is how many drinks constitute a 0.05 BAC, and the answer depends on various factors, including gender, weight and the amount of food intake before and after drinking. A rule of thumb is that men can consume two standard drinks in the first hour and one every following hour, while this number for women is one in the first and one each consecutive hour. One standard drink translates to one can of mid strength beer, one glass of red wine or a single shot of regular spirits.

    Solutions
    While there is no cure-all for drunk driving, there are measures that aim to actively decrease the number of drunk drivers on the roads. Seemingly, the most effective deterrent is automatic license revocation, and a zero tolerance policy. DUI courts specialize in addressing the problem of problematic repeat offenders by providing counselling and treatment for alcohol addiction. Demerits, fines, vehicle seizure policies and prison time also serve to discourage drunk driving. A long term solution lies in raising awareness about the perils of drunk driving, and awareness is rising. A shining example of this is that the USA has seen a halving of the number of drink driving deaths since 1980, even though the number of cars on the roads has exponentially grown. There are many myths surrounding drunk driving, but it is important to know that time is the only thing that will sober a person up. A cold shower, exercise or drinking strong coffee will do nothing at all to lower your BAC.

    Conclusion
    There is a steep price to pay for drunk driving, both in lives and in collateral damage. Even though most countries have a legally permissible amount you can drink before getting behind the wheel, it is best not to drink at all. A BAC of 0.08 makes you seven times more likely to have a car accident, and this is a gamble no one should take. Make sure to do everything in your power to avoid driving after you have had something to drink. Take a cab, have a designated sober driver, or simply walk home. It is sure better than not coming home at all.

    Related reading: Speed thrills and killsDriving Safety and Preventable Death: 9 Lifesaving Resources

  • Watch out for Trucks on the Road this Holiday Season

    We always share info on safe holiday travels, but here's a twist to consider...

    Road Safety: Surge in Semi Truck Accidents

    One person is injured or killed in a truck accident every 16 minutes. It’s not too often trucking accidents garner national attention, but the United States Department of Transportation estimates over 500,000 accidents occur every year. No wonder instantaneous, and perhaps previously considered irrational, fear sets in when caught in an 18-wheeler sandwich.

    Unfortunately truck-crash fatalities are rising, with an 18 percent increase from 2009 to 2012, according to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. Breaking the numbers down further, there are 10 fatal crashes and over 284 injuries a day. However, the number of trucks and their annual distance traveled are both down by over two percent.

    So who is to blame? Apparently, it’s debatable. In talking with safety advocates and trucking companies, blame is most often shifted between tired or distracted commercial truck drivers and companies and passenger vehicle drivers. Politics aside, there are safety tips commercial and noncommercial drivers should be aware of to avoid becoming part of these tragic national statistics.

    Noncommercial Driver Safety

    DrivingSemi trucks weigh exponentially more than the typical car, and with that comes limitations in braking and visibility- something the hurried driver may not think about when following too closely or jumping directly in front of. Below are safety tips for sharing the road with semis:

    Avoid “No-Zones”: areas behind and beside semi trucks where the driver has large blind spots.
    Do not abruptly change lanes in front of a truck; use your blinker and allow the driver time to notice your intentions.
    Avoid driving between semi trucks.
    When merging or pulling into traffic from the roadside, accelerate with enough speed to prevent the driver from needing to quickly brake.
    Avoid any type of unsafe passing when semi trucks are in close proximity.
    Avoid abandoning your vehicle in a travel lane; if possible, move the car completely off the shoulder and then wait for help.
    Do not maneuver around a semi truck making a right turn.

    Commercial Driver Safety

    Driving semi trucks or any large vehicle requires adequate training and comfortability with long travel days. It’s important drivers and their respective companies keep safety in mind amidst the continuously booming business. Safety tips for commercial drivers include:

    Stay current on training and driving techniques for your semi truck
    Set realistic schedules and mileage expectations to avoid driving while tired
    As is the law for all drivers, do not use cell phones or any other devices carrying the potential for driver distraction
    To prevent rollovers: avoid sudden movements, control your load on turns, control speed while maintaining proper “speed cushions”.
    Identify high risk areas on roads beforehand.
    Monitor weather conditions during your cross country travels.

    Jenna Murrell writes on behalf of Caldwell Wenzel & Asthana, PC, truck accident attorneys in Alabama.

  • Winter Driving

    WRN-AmbassadorAccording to Weather Ready Nation and the NOAA, on average, weather-related vehicle crashes kill 6,253 people and injure more than 480,000 each year, according to the Department of Transportation. Most of these accidents occur when the roadways are wet, snowy or icy. When the weather takes a turn for the worse this winter, take precautions if you have to be out on the roadways. Whether there is a coating of snow or ice on the roadways, or the asphalt just looks wet, SLOW DOWN! If the temperature is near freezing, drive like you’re on ice - you may be!

    Severe Weather

    Winter Driving Safety

    Tips for Safe Winter Driving

    Take the weather with you on your mobile phone!

    Workplace preparedness and response: Severe weather emergencies

    Winter-Driving

  • Remember Road Fatalities

    Today is World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims. Most of us know of someone killed in a car accident or on a roadway.  This is the day to think of them.

    This year's theme is:

    "It's time to Remember - Say NO to Road Crime!"

    The World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims (WDR) is commemorated on the third Sunday of November each year – to remember the many millions killed and injured on the world’s roads, together with their families, friends and many others who are also affected. It is also a Day on which we thank the emergency services and reflect on the tremendous burden and cost of this daily continuing disaster to families, communities and countries, and on ways to halt it.

    Road deaths and injuries are sudden, violent, traumatic events. Their impact is long-lasting, often permanent. Each year, millions of newly injured and bereaved people from every corner of the world are added to the countless millions who already suffer. The cumulative toll is truly tremendous.

    Download a copy of this year's WDR Poster to share Download a copy of this year's WDR Poster to share

    The grief and distress experienced by this huge number of people is all the greater because many of the victims are young, because many of the crashes could and should have been prevented and because governments’ and society’s response to road death and injury and to bereaved and injured victims is often inadequate, unsympathetic, and inappropriate to a loss of life or quality of life.

    This special Remembrance Day is therefore intended to respond to the great need of road crash victims for public recognition of their loss and suffering. It has also become an important tool for governments and those who work to prevent crashes or respond to the aftermath, as it offers the opportunity to demonstrate the enormous scale and impact of road death and injury and the urgent need for action.

  • Are Your Car's Tires Solid?

    We talk about being prepared for roadside emergencies often, as well as driving safety and weather concerns when driving... how about a core issue of what your vehicle is riding on? Not the roads, which you (probably) have little control over the condition of, but your tires?

    Your car's tires can effect the the way your car handles, however can effect the performance and fuel economy of your vehicle. One of the most important things you can do is an established schedule to check you air pressure in your tires. Incorrect air pressure is a majot hazard when driving. Tire failure while driving leads to many automobile accidents and possible injury to both driver and passengers.

    A safe tire has no cuts or bumps. The tread depth must be at least 1.6mm throughout central 3/4s of the breadth of the tire and around the entire outer circumference.

     

    Avoid getting stranded or paying high priced towing bills. Check air pressure on your spare often as well. Note: If you have different rims than came on automobile initially, be certain that the bolts on your spare tire are the suitable fitting. Failure to keep the tires properly inflated may foster wear and will have a negative effect with your vehicles handling.

    First Aid Store offers Name Brand Auto First Aid Kits - Car, Auto, Vehicle and Truck First Aid Kits. First Aid Only, AAA, American Red Cross, Genuine First Aid, North, and Lifeline Auto First Aid and Roadside Emergency Kits.

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