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Monthly Archives: December 2014

  • Pre-Holiday Safety Tips

    Prepare with Care:  

    First - think about Practical and Useful Gifts for everyone on your list. Safety Items can be fun. There are clever, affordable, and unique gift ideas for Pets, Kids, Family, Travelers, Sports Enthusiasts, Outdoor Adventurers, and more. Why give a gift that goes in a drawer or gets "re-gifted"? Check out our Gift Packs, too!

    Planning and preparation is essential to reducing your stress during the holiday season.  While we can’t help you manage your budgets, guests, and travel arrangements, we can help you plan and arrange for safe holiday decorations.

    • If you haven’t already done so this month, test all smoke alarms.  Replace the batteries, or smoke alarm if it is not working properly.
    •  Inspect all electrical decorations and replace any that are cracked, frayed, or have other breaks in the insulation of any wires.
    • Plan out the placement of your holiday lighting so that no more than three strands are strung together (unless using LEDs).
    • Outdoor electric lights and decorations should be plugged into circuits protected by ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs).  If circuits are not GFCI-protected, portable outdoor GFCIs can be purchased where electrical supplies are sold and require no special knowledge or equipment to install.
    • Be sure to check each product label or packaging to determine whether it is intended for indoors or outdoors and utilize accordingly.
    • Arrange your decorations so that no outlet is overloaded and no cords will be pinched by furniture or positioned under rugs.
    •  Be sure all heating sources or open flames, such as a candle or fireplace, are given a three foot buffer from any decorations.

    Read More on Holiday Safety!

    Download the Holiday Safety Infographic!Pre-Holiday

  • Driving Safety and Preventable Death: 9 Lifesaving Resources

    They government has a website all about Distracted Driving Distracted Driving
    NHTSA Distracted Driving Picture A new study finds daydreaming is more a cause of distracted-driving accidents than cell-phone use. | April 05, 2013 | National Highway Traffic Safety Administration NHTSA Distracted Driving Picture - A new study finds daydreaming is more a cause of distracted-driving accidents than cell-phone use. | April 05, 2013 | National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

    Each day in the United States, more than 9 people are killed and more than 1,153 people are injured in crashes that are reported to involve a distracted driver (1). At any given daylight moment across America, approximately 660,000 drivers are using cell phones or manipulating electronic devices while driving, a number that has held steady since 2010 (2). Drivers in their 20s make up 27 percent of the distracted drivers in fatal crashes (3).

    The following resources provide safety tips for drivers of all ages and experience. They are a must-read for anyone who operates a motor vehicle. Please review and share them with anyone you believe may benefit:

    Image of AAA Severe Weather Road Kit AAA Severe Weather Road Kit

    Distracted Driving | Facts and Stats
    http://www.distraction.gov/content/get-the-facts/facts-and-statistics.html

    The Ultimate Guide to Staying Safe Behind the Wheel
    http://www.onlineloancalculator.org/resources/driving-safety.php

    Eyes on the Road: A Podcast from the CDC
    http://www2c.cdc.gov/podcasts/player.asp?f=8627653

    Understanding the Distracted Brain: Why Driving While Using Hands-Free Cell Phones is Risky Behavior
    http://www.nsc.org/DistractedDrivingDocuments/Cognitive-Distraction-White-Paper.pdf

    Roadside Emergency Kits for the Unexpected - Auto Survival Kits... From our AAA Severe Weather Road Kit to the Economy Road Warrior Kit, we offer a broad selection of Auto Emergency Kits like the Urban Warrior Kit, Mountain Road Warrior Kit & High Visibility Incident Unit. Roadside Emergency Kits for the Unexpected - Auto Survival Kits... From our AAA Severe Weather Road Kit to the Economy Road Warrior Kit, we offer a broad selection of Auto Emergency Kits like the Urban Warrior Kit, Mountain Road Warrior Kit & High Visibility Incident Unit.

    Safety on the Road
    http://www.nsc.org/Pages/nsc-on-the-road.aspx

    The Complete Guide to Safe Parking
    http://www.parkwhiz.com/safe-parking-guide/

    Parents Central | From Car Seats to Car Keys: Keeping Kids Safe
    http://www.safercar.gov/parents/index.htm

    What to Do After a Car Crash
    http://kidshealth.org/teen/safety/driving/post_crash.html

    Tips for After a Car Accident: 10 Things to Note
    http://www.comparasave.com/tips-for-after-a-car-accident-ten-things-to-note

    NOW WHAT?

    Learn, Share, Prepare, and for goodness sale... DRIVE SAFE!

    READ MORE


    REFERENCES

    1. http://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/distracted_driving/
    2. http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/811719.pdf
    3. http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/811737.pdf
  • Holiday Lights and Decorations

    As the lights go up decorating businesses and neighborhoods, we think of egg nog, yule logs, cheer, and in the safety business, National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation comes to mind as well.

    winter-safety-tileHoliday twinkle lights and powered decorations can bring electrical and fire hazards when used in abundance or without proper precautions.

    Findings from a 2013 ESFI consumer survey indicate that more than 86% of Americans decorate their homes as part of their winter holiday celebrations.  Almost two-thirds of respondents use electric lights in their indoor decorating scheme, while more than half use lighted decorations outside their homes.  More than 60% of those who decorate their homes for the holiday utilize at least one extension cord.

    While holiday lighting and electrical decorations do contribute to the splendor of the season, they can also significantly increase the risk fires and electrical injuries if not used safely.  Given these safety hazards, it is crucial that safety is a foremost concern.

    Think of this and other Winter Safety to assure your Holidays are festive, not fraught with worry.

    More:

    Holiday lightsOver the years employers have discovered that their employees miss more time from work as a result of "off-the-job" accidents than due to injuries experienced on the job. Many of these accidents occur during the winter holidays, as employees do things that they are not familiar with or haven't done "since last year". Fortunately, most of these accidents can be prevented.

    Our safety training products on "Winter Safety" show employees how to plan ahead, look for potential hazards and avoid dangerous situations that occur during the winter holiday season. Topics covered in these products include:

    • Surviving in the cold.
    • Keeping your workplace safe in icy conditions.
    • Dressing for the weather.
    • Driving in winter weather.
    • Holiday decorations.
    • Celebrating the season safely.
    • and more.

    Get a Quote for a Class:
    Winter Safety Live Instruction Training Courses at YOUR Location

  • Forklift Safety Rules

    Fork-revOSHA's Powered Industrial Lift Truck Standard required site- and equipment-specific training for anyone working on or around lifts in the workplace. The training must occur for all personnel before working on or around a forklift or other powered lift (including Walkie-Stackers and Powered Pallet Jacks.) With refresher training every three years for all personnel and/or retraining whenever there is an accident or perceived unsafe behavior.

    This is not the same as Forklift Operator training - it is not about how to drive or "run" a forklift, but rather the safety aspects to operating one.

    Some basic Forklift Safety Rules:

    Forklifts and other powered industrial trucks are indispensable in many companies. They are rugged, powerful tools that save time, money and effort. But the same qualities that make them so helpful can also make them dangerous. Using powered industrial trucks results in over 100 fatalities and over 35,000 serious injuries each year. When used incorrectly, or if forklifts and other trucks are not properly maintained, they can do significant damage. Forklifts and other powered industrial trucks are indispensable in many companies. They are rugged, powerful tools that save time, money and effort. But the same qualities that make them so helpful can also make them dangerous. Using powered industrial trucks results in over 100 fatalities and over 35,000 serious injuries each year. When used incorrectly, or if forklifts and other trucks are not properly maintained, they can do significant damage.

    1. Operate the forklift only if you've been trained
    2. Maintain a safe following distance from other forklifts - about three vehicle lengths.
    3. Follow our speed limit and other regulations
    4. Drive with your load low - six or eight inches off the ground - and tilted slightly back
    5. Exercise extra caution when driving over duckboards and bridge plates and make sure your load is within their capacity as well
    6. Raise and lower your load only when you are stopped
    7. Stop and sound the horn at intersections
    8. Avoid sharp turns.
    9. Keep you arms and legs inside the vehicle
    10. Be sure to wear a hard hat and other protective equipment when necessary
    11. Be sure your load is stable and secure
    12. When leaving the forklift, lower the forks, neutralize the controls, shut it off and set the brakes

    forklift-powered-industrial-truck-safety-tileTraining should be hands on in the environment as well as lecture and instructional with skills assessment both in writing and by review of performance in the working environment. This can be done via On-site Forklift Safety Training by a certified Forklift Safety Instructor - or it can be accomplished using OSHA Compliant Powered Industrial Lift Truck (Forklift) Safety Training Materials... as long as the employer designates a competent person to oversee the training and be available to answer any questions the students may have regarding the forklift regulations, rules, and materials. In either case, formal documentation and record-keeping is required.

    Forklifts and other powered industrial trucks are indispensable in many companies. They are rugged, powerful tools that save time, money and effort. But the same qualities that make them so helpful can also make them dangerous. Using powered industrial trucks results in over 100 fatalities and over 35,000 serious injuries each year. When used incorrectly, or if forklifts and other trucks are not properly maintained, they can do significant damage.

    Our training products on "Forklift/Powered Industrial Truck Safety" have been specifically created to assist facilities in complying with OSHA's Powered Industrial Truck Standard. Topics covered in these products include:

    • OSHA's certification process.
    • The seven classes of industrial trucks.
    • Equipment checkout and maintenance.
    • A forklift's stability triangle.
    • Safe operating procedures.
    • Lifting and lowering loads.
    • Trucks and loading docks.
    • and more!

    Get a Quote for a Class:
    Forklift / Powered Industrial Truck Safety Live Instruction Training Courses at YOUR Location

    READ MORE:

    See all the Easy-to-Use OSHA Safety Training Materials available! See all the Easy-to-Use OSHA Safety Training Materials available!
  • Your dog or cat is not spreading Ebola. (What people REALLY need to know about Ebola)

    It's true... Your dog or cat is not spreading Ebola.

    Here are the Top 10 Things You Need to know about Ebola.

    There have been no reports of dogs or cats becoming sick with Ebola or of being able
    to spread Ebola to people or other animals. Because the risk of an Ebola outbreak
    spreading rapidly in the United States is very low, the risk to pets is also very low, too
    Food and drinks imported into the United States from West Africa are safe to eat and drink
    No one has been infected with Ebola from foods that are imported into the United States
    to date. You can’t get Ebola from food grown or legally purchased in the United States.
    Mosquitoes are the deadliest animals in the world, but they don’t carry Ebola
    There have been no reports of mosquitoes or other insects transmitting Ebola
    virus. Only mammals (for example, humans, bats, monkeys, and apes) have
    become infected with Ebola virus and spread it. Mosquitoes do carry other
    organisms, like malaria and West Nile virus, that can make people very sick,
    and sometimes even cause death.
    Your family members, coworkers, and neighbors returning from countries with Ebola outbreaks don’t pose a danger to you and your family
    Ebola is spread through direct contact with blood or body fluids (including but not
    limited to urine, saliva, sweat, feces, vomit, breast milk, and semen) from a person sick
    with Ebola. Not everyone coming from countries with Ebola outbreaks has been in
    contact with someone who has Ebola. Travelers coming from countries with a large Ebola
    outbreak will be given a CARE (Check and Report Ebola) kit at the airport to help monitor
    themselves for Ebola symptoms. In addition, they will be actively monitored, meaning
    they are checked on at least once a day by public health officials. It’s safe for you and
    your family to be around people being monitored as long as they do not have signs or
    symptoms of Ebola.
    Household bleach and other disinfectants kill Ebola
    Household bleach or an EPA-registered hospital disinfectant will kill Ebola.
    If you’re feeling sick, think flu not Ebola
    Although flu and Ebola have some similar symptoms, Ebola is rare disease, particularly
    in the United States. Flu is very common. To date, four cases of Ebola have been detected in the United States, and two of those were imported from West Africa. Every year in the United States, millions of people are infected with flu, hundreds of thousands are hospitalized, and tens of thousands die from flu.
    Unless you have had direct contact with someone who is sick with Ebola, your symptoms
    are most likely caused by flu and you do not have Ebola.
    Ebola is not airborne
    Ebola is not a respiratory disease and is not spread through the airborne route.
    There is no evidence that Ebola is spread by coughing or sneezing. Ebola might be
    spread through large droplets (splashes or sprays) but only when a person is very
    sick. That’s why hospital workers must wear personal protective equipment around
    people with Ebola to stay safe.
    The Ebola outbreak is not affecting the safety of airline travel
    Airline travelers in the United States are extremely unlikely to become infected with
    Ebola. All travelers coming from Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, or Mali, arrive at one
    of five airports in the United States where entry screening by Customs and Border
    Protection and CDC is taking place.
    Ebola is only spread from one person to another once symptoms begin
    Symptoms of Ebola appear anywhere from 2 to 21 days (average 8 to 10 days)
    after being exposed. A person infected with Ebola cannot spread it to others
    until symptoms begin.
    You can’t get Ebola from a handshake or a hug
    Ebola is spread through direct contact with body fluids from a person sick with Ebola.
    Direct contact means that blood or body fluids (including but not limited to urine,
    saliva, sweat, feces, vomit, breast milk, and semen) from an infected person (alive or
    dead) have touched another person’s eyes, nose, or mouth, or an open cut or wound.
    Read more Ebola Facts

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