First Aid Store

Guess What We Sell?™ ...a lot more than First Aid

877.534.7782
Online 24/7+Friendly Toll Free Service 6-6 Pacific/9-9 Eastern (Monday-Friday)
Search Site

    Tag Archives: Floods

    • Remember what we just said about flooding?

      As we mentioned in our post Winter will end – Floods will begin: "Winter has brought a lot of rain and flooding in the West"... see?

      FEMA Activates To Support California with Potential Oroville Auxiliary Spillway Failure

      Oroville Auxiliary Spillway

      Oakland Regional Response Coordination Center Moves to 24-Hour Operations

      OAKLAND, Calif. --  The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), through its Regional Response Coordination Center (RRCC) in Oakland, Calif.

    • Preparing for Floods: What You Should Know

      Floods - why are we talking about them in Summer? They happen... not just from summer storms, and rain melt, but also from storm surge and hurricanes creating inland flooding.

      The summer season brings warm temperatures and longer days, but it can also bring heavy rains that can increase your risk for one of the most common disasters in the United States – floods.  Properly preparing for this hazard can keep your family safe, minimize potential damage, and speed up recovery efforts.

      While everyone is at risk for flooding, many remain financially unprotected. One of the best ways to protect your home is by purchasing flood insurance because homeowner’s insurance policies may not cover flood losses. Keep in mind that there is a 30-day waiting period before flood coverage takes effect!

      In addition to flood insurance, the How to Prepare for a Flood guide from America’s PrepareAthon! outlines steps you can take to safeguard your home and possessions, including:

      • Keep important papers in a fireproof, waterproof box. For electronic records, keep a backup drive in your fireproof, waterproof box or store files using a secure, backed up web-based service.
      • Elevate the furnace, water heater, and electric panel if the location is susceptible to flooding.
      • Install “check valves” in sewer lines to prevent floodwater from backing up into the drains of your home.

      No matter the source, a flood does not have to be a catastrophic event to be costly. Just a few inches of water can cause thousands of dollars in damage. Check out this interactive Cost of Flooding tool from FloodSmart.gov to measure the financial impact a flood could have on your home.

      How-to-prepare-for-a-flood

    • What's Your Plan?

      Here at the end of Hurricane Preparedness Week, we'd like to suggest you formalize your reaction plan... think it through, write it down, consider not just hurricanes (and Cyclones and Typhoons) , but related floods, storm surge, evacuation, etc.

      Complete your written hurricane plan:

      The time to prepare for a hurricane is before the season begins, when you have the time and are not under pressure. If you wait until a hurricane is on your doorstep, the odds are that you will be under duress and will make the wrong decisions. Take the time now to write down your hurricane plan. Know where you will ride out the storm and get your supplies now. You don’t want to be standing in long lines when a hurricane warning is issued. Those supplies that you need will probably be sold out by the time you reach the front of the line. Being prepared, before a hurricane threatens, makes you resilient to the hurricane impacts of wind and water. It will mean the difference between your being a hurricane victim and a hurricane survivor.

      Hurricane_Prepare_4-4-16

    • Flood Safety Update

      FloodsBefore a Flood

      • Learn whether your home, school or place of work is at risk of flooding.
      • Find alternate routes to important locations.
      • Have a "Go Bag" ready.
      • Make a family communications plan.
      • If evacuation orders are issued in advance, follow them.

      During a Flood

      • Never drive or walk into flood waters.
      • If told to evacuate, do so immediately.
      • Get to higher ground.
      • Get information from local tv/radio or your mobile phone.

      After a Flood

      • Avoid damaged areas and flood waters.
      • Heed road closed and other cautionary signs.
      • Wait for the “all clear” to enter a flood damaged structure.
      • Contact your loved ones via text or social media to keep phone lines clear.

      LEARN MORE:

    • Flood-related injuries and death

      During Week 2 of National Preparedness Month, we are focusing on Wildfires., But take a look back at last week, too - did you consider your risk if flood? Flood-Risk-Map

      Flood-related injuries and deaths are often the result of individuals trapped in floodwaters. The best way to stay safe is to leave areas that flood and avoid floodwaters.

      Be ready for Floods:

    • Flooding: Are you Prepared?

      Flooding is the most common natural disaster in the United States and can happen anywhere. Protect yourself and your property, and take the steps now so that you can act quickly when you, your home, or your business is in danger. Here in the Week 1 of National Preparedness Month we're focusing on Floods:

      WHAT:  Flooding is an overflowing of water onto land that is normally dry. Flooding may happen with only a few inches of water, or it may cover a house to the rooftop.

      WHEN: Flooding can occur during any season, but some areas of the country are at greater risk at certain times of the year. Coastal areas are at greater risk for flooding during hurricane season (i.e., June to November), while the Midwest is more at risk in the spring and during heavy summer rains. Ice jams occur in the spring in the Northeast and Northwest. Even the deserts of the Southwest are at risk during the late summer monsoon season.Flood_3

      WHERE: Flooding can happen in any U.S. state or territory. It is particularly important to be prepared for flooding if you live in a low-lying area near a body of water, such as a river, stream, or culvert; along a coast; or downstream from a dam or levee.

      HOW:
      Flooding can occur in several ways, including the following.

      • Rivers and lakes cannot contain excessive rain or snowmelt. - Excessive rain or snowmelt cannot be fully absorbed into the ground.
      • Waterways are blocked with debris or ice and overflow.
      • Water containment systems break, such as levees, dams, or water or sewer systems.
      • Strong winds from tropical storms or hurricanes cause a storm surge by pushing seawater onto land. The speed and duration of flooding can vary significantly.

      The speed and duration of flooding can vary significantly.

      • Flooding can occur slowly as rain continues to fall for many days. This type of flooding, sometimes called a slow-onset flood, can take a week to develop and can last for months before floodwaters recede.
      • Rapid-onset floods occur more quickly, typically developing within hours or days. These types of floods usually occur in smaller watersheds experiencing heavy rainfall, particularly in mountainous and urban areas, and the water usually recedes within a few days.
      • Some rapid-onset floods known as flash floods occur very quickly with little or no warning, such as during periods of extremely heavy rain or when levees, dams, ice jams, or water systems break. Densely populated areas are at a high risk for flash floods. In urban areas, flash floods can fill underpasses, viaducts, parking structures, low roads, and basements.
      • The strong winds of a tropical cyclone or hurricane can push large amounts of seawater up onto the land, causing a storm surge. A storm surge combines with the ocean’s tide to produce a storm-tide surge. Storm-tide surges have been registered as high as almost 35 feet above normal sea level and can cause significant flooding across a large area. This generally occurs over a short period, typically 4 to 8 hours, but in some areas, it can take much longer for the water to recede to its pre-storm level.

      IMPACT:

      The physical destruction caused by flooding depends on the speed and level of the water, the duration of the flood, terrain and soil conditions, and the built environment (e.g., buildings, roads, and bridges).

      • Flooding can cause fatalities and serious injuries for people who are trapped or swept away by wading in, driving through, or boating across floodwaters.
      • Transportation routes, power, water, gas, and other services may be disrupted.
      • Commercial supplies and government support systems may be temporarily unavailable.
      • Drinking water supplies and wells may become polluted.
      • Floodwaters can cause erosion, which can damage roads, bridge structures, levees, and buildings with weak foundations, causing their collapse without warning. The floodwaters may carry the worn-away mud, rocks, and other sediment.
      • Landslides and mudslides can occur.
      • Even a few inches of floodwater in a home can cause tens of thousands of dollars in damage.
    • Floods 💦

      Floods, Flooding, Rising Waters - Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas inundated - Michigan, Tennessee and other areas braced for onslaught... Hurricane season begins tomorrow, yet storms are already devastating many American Communities.

      Are you Storm Ready? Flood Secure? Evacuation Prepared?flood

    • What is a Flood Warning? What is a Flood Watch?

      It is Flood Season - learn the difference between a Flood Watch and a Flood Warning? A Warning means “Take Action!” because flooding is either happening or will happen shortly. A Watch means “Be Prepared” because conditions are right for flooding to occur in your area.
      Flooded

      http://1.usa.gov/1gCKLWE  #FloodSafety #WRW

      Survival Gear! Wouldn't you like to be a Prepper too?
      Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car.
      Are you Ready?
      Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time.
      Check your Emergency Supplies:

      • Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries)
      • Count your stock... is it enough?
      • Don't let your gas tank get below half-full
      • Keep cash on hand - ATMs may not be available, and you cannot count on credit cards in an emergency.
      • Think Ahead-Plan Wisely-Prepare Yourself to Survive!

      Survival Gear Including: Survival Kits, C.E.R.T. Products and gear, Pet Emergency Kits/Supplies, Outdoor Supplies, Triage Units, Trauma Kits, Search & Rescue Equipment & Disaster and Survival Videos, Emergency Shelters, Lighting, Food & Heating.

    • Wild Weather!

      Are you Ready for Spring Onslaughts?

      WRN-AmbassadorTornadoes, floods, thunderstorms, winds, hail, lightning, heat, wildfires, rip currents and tsunamis - spring is three months of danger that can imperil the unprepared. It roars in like a lion and continues to roar across the United States throughout March, April and May.

      Spring is a time of transition, when late-season snowstorms can impact the East Coast and the Northern Plains, thunderstorms rip across the South and Midwest, rivers overflow their banks and heat waves begin in the Southwest. And there’s one hazard that can strike the coasts at any time: tsunamis.

      Don’t let this dangerous season catch you unaware. Get ready for spring with just a few simple steps: Know Your Risk, Take Action and Be a Force of Nature.

      1. Know Your Risk
      Tornadoes, floods, thunderstorm winds, hail, lightning, heat, wildfires, rip currents and tsunamis can be a killer for the unprepared. Here’s what you need to know about these dangerous hazards:

      • Since 2003, 43 states within the continental United States have come under a tornado watch; 49 states have come under severe thunderstorm watches; and lightning strikes occur in every state.
      • More than half of the total freshwater flood-related deaths each year result from motorists driving into floodwaters. It only takes 12 inches of water to carry off a small vehicle.
      • Heat is one of the leading weather-related killers in the United States, resulting in hundreds of deaths each year. The heat wave of 1995 claimed more than 700 lives in the Chicago area alone.
      • In 2014, there were 26 lightning fatalities - six in Florida alone.
      • Wildfires kill 30 people, destroy 2,800 homes and burn more than 7 million acres, on average per year.
      • The United States Lifesaving Association estimates that more than 100 people each year die in the surf zone waters of the U.S. and that rip currents cause the majority of those fatalities.
      • Since the beginning of the 20th century, 34 tsunami events have caused more than 500 deaths and over $1.7 billion (2014 dollars) in damage to U.S. coastal states and territories.

      Spring Has Sprung! Get Ready for Some of America’s Wildest Weather Wild Weather

      2. Take Action
      While the weather may be wild, you are not powerless. Prepare for spring hazards including tornadoes, floods, thunderstorm winds, hail, lightning, heat, wildfires, rip currents and tsunamis with these simple steps:

      • You may have only minutes to find shelter before a tornado strikes. Practice a family tornado drill at least once a year.
      • Whether driving or walking, any time you come to a flooded road, Turn Around Don't Drown®.
      • Check to see if officials in charge of sports have a written lightning safety plan.
      • Extreme heat comes early to the Southwest. During a heat wave, reschedule strenuous outdoor activities for the coolest time of the day.
      • If you live near wildland areas, make sure you home is Firewise and fire-safe.
      • This spring break, avoid rip currents by checking the local beach forecast and talking to the lifeguard.
      • If you live, work or play on the coast, learn about tsunami safety.

      3. Be a Force of Nature
      Being prepared is about helping your community. Share your weather and emergency preparedness story and you’ll inspire others to prepare.

      • Write a post on Facebook. Share with your friends and family the details of how you’re weather-ready.
      • Tweet that you’re prepared with #SpringSafetyPrep. Help us build an online community of the prepared.
      • Create a Family Communication Plan so that your loved ones know how to get in touch during an emergency. And let your friends know that they should create a plan also.
      • Look for ways to help your town prepare, such as joining a Community Emergency Response Team.
      • Register for America’s PrepareAthon! to learn how to stay safe during disasters.

      These simple steps will help keep you safe from tornadoes, floods, lightning, heat, wildfires, rip currents and tsunamis. A little bit of preparation can make a big difference. And being ready for these hazards will help you throughout the year.

      Survival Gear! Wouldn't you like to be a Prepper too?
      Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car.
      Are you Ready?
      Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time.
      Check your Emergency Supplies:

      • Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries)
      • Count your stock... is it enough?
      • Don't let your gas tank get below half-full
      • Keep cash on hand - ATMs may not be available, and you cannot count on credit cards in an emergency.
      • Think Ahead-Plan Wisely-Prepare Yourself to Survive!

      Survival Gear Including: Survival Kits, C.E.R.T. Products and gear, Pet Emergency Kits/Supplies, Outdoor Supplies, Triage Units, Trauma Kits, Search & Rescue Equipment & Disaster and Survival Videos, Emergency Shelters, Lighting, Food & Heating.

       

       

    • Flooding happens: Everywhere

      Think you aren't in an area at risk for flooding? Think again.

      Floods happen year round and in any and all locales.

      Whether from Spring snow melts, back up sewers, hurricanes, tsunami or other - everyone is at risk and should know their appropriate flood safety. Learn more and be ready!

      According to FloodSmart.gov, everyone everywhere is in a flood zone. In the last 5 years, all 50 states have experienced floods or flash floods.

      Survival Gear for Businesses and Preparedness Products for Home & Auto Survival Gear for Businesses and Preparedness Products for Home & Auto

      What are flood zones?

      FloodSmartFlood zones are land areas identified by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Each flood zone describes that land area in terms of its risk of flooding. Everyone lives in a flood zone–it's just a question of whether you live in a low, moderate, or high risk area.

      • Just a few inches of water from a flood can cause tens of thousands of dollars in damage.
      • Flash floods often bring walls of water 10 to 20 feet high.
      • A car can easily be carried away by just two feet of floodwater.
      • Hurricanes, winter storms and snowmelt are common (but often overlooked) causes of flooding.
      • New land development can increase flood risk, especially if the construction changes natural runoff paths.

      Flood

    Items 1 to 10 of 28 total

    Page:
    1. 1
    2. 2
    3. 3