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    • 3 Days left! Is your First Aid Kit ANSI 2015 compliance ready?

      New ANSI 2015 Standards for First Aid KitsFAO_ANSI-First-Aid-Kit-Calendar

      Are you ready for the change?

      The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) has changed the standard for first aid kits in the workplace. The new standard goes into effect June 17, 2016.

      First Aid Store offers a full line of kits to help meet the new ANSI standard and OSHA regulations.

      See all our ANSI 2015 Compliant First Aid Kits & Cabinets See all our ANSI 2015 Compliant First Aid Kits & Cabinets

      Choose from a wide assortment of kits designed to meet your needs.
      Find your kit today!

      Our professional customer service sales teams are ready for your questions. 

      Call us today at (877) 5-First Aid (877-534-7782)

      Learn more about the ANSI update:

    • #FlagDay

      Sflagbox2ince President Wilson first proclaimed Flag day on June 14th in 1916, this date has been a day to recognize the American Flag and its adoption and symbolism in the USA. The United states Flag was originally adopted by the Second Continental Congress on June 14th in 1777.
      While recognized by Congress in 1949, Flag Day is not an "official" holiday, and must be proclaimed
      each year by the current US President (every President since Wilson has done so.)

    • Comply with new workplace first aid kit upgrade requirements

      URG-3684_3 In 2015, ANSI changed their first aid kit standards. On June 17th, 2016, the new standards go into effect. It is likely that the kit you currently house will no longer be up to date. While ANSI sets quality and safety standards and guidelines across many industries, they are not an enforcement agency. However, the standards they set forth are, essentially, the nationwide core base level that one should meet, or exceed. In fact, many states have adopted the regularly changing ANSI standards as their requirements to be followed. As such, it is highly recommended for businesses to act in accordance with these guidelines to ensure the safety of the employees and to avoid any possible citations or shortcomings, even if the state in which they reside does not mandate the standards be adhered to.

      1715This guideline change is mostly in regard to the degree of injuries that may occur as well as the content contained within the first aid kit. Two variants have been introduced – Class A, designed for areas in which typical or basic wounds may occur such as an office building, and Class B, constructed for environments with risk for more serious injuries such as a construction site. While the kit can be unitized (color-coded boxes) or bulk (loose, but organized, pieces), specific items must be included and even more precise product requirements are to be met (such as the tape’s width). Additionally, the outside label identifying the kit must include particular verbiage to indicate that the ANSI standards are only met if/when the content within the kit meets the stated minimum fill. Surely, these changes and requirements can be overwhelming or hard to compute, especially for those whom aren’t overly familiar with ANSI or what is required of them at their workplace. For the convenience of our customers, and in effort to help everyone stay compliant, we have designed “upgrade kit packs” so that an existing ANSI kit can be easily taken from the prior (2009) standards to the current (2015) guidelines. This is in addition to the many stocked units that we also carry, for those purchasing a kit for the first time or whom would prefer to “start over” anew.

      osha-ansi-new-compliance-requirements-cms-banner

      ALSO READ:

    • Prepared Pets?

      When planning for emergencies... have you considered your pets?

      What's in Your Pet Prep Kit?

      Graphic: What's in Your Pet Prep Kit?

      • Include your pets in your emergency plans
      • Build a separate emergency kit for your pets
      • Make sure and keep digital records and/or pictures to identify your pet after a disaster in case you become separated
      • Create a list of places that accept pets if an emergency happens

      Read more:

    • Preparation is Key: How to Make Sure Your Office is Hurricane Ready

      Disaster-Survival-GearREADY FOR A WILD ONE?

      Time to get your office ready for hurricane season - see our hurricane supplies for the office, be sure to visit our hundreds of articles about Disaster & Survival Preparedness and check out the great infographic from Quill below!

      Preparation is Key: How to Make Sure Your Office is Hurricane Ready

      PRE-pared means yo plan and supply yourself BEFORE Disaster Strikes! PRE-pared means yo plan and supply yourself BEFORE Disaster Strikes!
    • 7 Essential Items for Welding Safety

      weldWelding is undoubtedly a dangerous profession and whether you are a seasoned pro or a newbie DIYer learning welding skills for the first time, it is vital to wear the right safety gear.

      Without it you could damage your eyes with the brightness of the welding arc, you could suffer burns from sparks and even suffer illness in the long term from exposure to noxious gases. So what protective workwear and equipment do you need to stay safe on the job? Let's take a look:

      1 - Gloves

      First Aid Store offers training products on Welding Safety to remind employees that there are indeed a number of hazards associated with welding, and provide the information they need to work safely when involved with welding operations. Topics covered in these products include: Getting authorization for welding operations, Sparking and the risk of fire, Guards and protective barriers, Hazardous fumes and ventilation, The use of respirators and other personal protective equipment, Inspecting welding equipment, Proper welding safety procedures, Eye protection (welding helmets, filters, glasses and goggles) First Aid Store offers training products on Welding Safety to remind employees that there are indeed a number of hazards associated with welding, and provide the information they need to work safely when involved with welding operations. Topics covered in these products include: Getting authorization for welding operations, Sparking and the risk of fire, Guards and protective barriers, Hazardous fumes and ventilation, The use of respirators and other personal protective equipment, Inspecting welding equipment, Proper welding safety procedures, Eye protection (welding helmets, filters, glasses and goggles)

      To keep your hands safe while undertaking welding work you really need to wear some good quality gloves. They should be flame resistant to protect against sparks, and if kept dry will also reduce the extent of electric shocks.

      2 - Boots
      It's all about ankle coverage when it comes to footwear for welders. You should make sure you have a minimum of 6 inches coverage, again to protect yourself from sparks and debris. Thick leather is the best material to go for, and steel toe caps are always a good idea if you're working around heavy machinery.

      3 - Ear protection

      If the equipment you are using means that conversation is not easy at a normal level, it probably means that the equipment could be causing damage to your ears. Ears are also at risk from sparks, which is why noise-cancelling ear protectors are a good investment.

      4 - Helmets, glasses and goggles

      To stay safe when welding you need helmet, glasses and goggles, or a full face shield. The UV radiation caused by the burning of a welding arc can cause cataracts, retinal burning and other issues, plus sparks are another obvious hazard for the eyes. Welding helmets with suitable shading are a must if you want to look after your vision.

      A good tip is to choose a level of shade that makes the burning arc invisible, and then go one lighter. This will make sure you have good visibility and protection.

      Eye-Drops5 - Eye Drops

      Like Goggles, eye drops are essential for keeping your eyesight and avoiding damage to vision from dryness, heat and arc flasj

      6 - Fire-retardant workwear

      Burns are not uncommon injuries for welders, which is why fire-protective clothing is an absolute must. Make sure your skin is completely covered and never wear synthetic fabrics when welding. Thick, natural fabrics are the best choices, but a quick internet search will give you plenty of options for suitable welding wear. And if you have an employer it's their responsibility to provide you with suitable clothing - plus training, to help you avoid injury or accident.

      Welder 16 Unit First Aid Kit - Plastic7 - Welder First Aid Kit

      Welder's First Aid Kit in Durable, Sturdy plastic case with a rubber gasket for protection. Welder's Kit includes 1/2 oz. Industrial Eye Drops & 1 Oz. Eye Wash. Industrial strength workers deserve industrial strength care. Our 114-piece, 16-unit welder's first aid kit focuses on a wide range of injuries common to welders such as minor cuts, sprains, welder's arc and other common eye irritations. Products are contained in a sturdy plastic case with gasket.

      You can find out more about welding safety by reading Welding & Hot Work Fire Prevention ChecklistCauses of Welding Accidents, and in this recent guide which has several resources on the topic of welding workwear - http://www.r-techwelding.co.uk/welding-safety-the-essential-guide/

      So bear these points in mind if you are a welder of any kind, and stay safe out there!

    • Hot Times

      It is only June and we’re already experiencing record temperatures in the Pacific Northwest, the Weather Channel says Record highs will be threatened later this week as temperatures climb into the upper 90s and low 100s in the Plains, Midwest and South.... and predictions call for a hot, hot, hot summer nationwide!Hot

      While the sunny days are great for all-day outdoor activities or an overnight jaunt to the beach, they’re not so pleasant for outdoor workers and can have serious health implications... especially for the elderly and very young.

      Learn more about Summer, Sun, and Heat Safety:

    • FDA Warning: Aspirin-Containing Antacid Medicines Can Cause Bleeding

      StomachDrugs containing an antacid and aspirin, and used to treat heartburn, sour stomach, acid indigestion, or upset stomach, can cause serious bleeding, FDA warns.

      Read the Drug Facts label to see if the product you’re using for these conditions has aspirin, especially if you have a risk factor for bleeding.

      The next time you reach for an over-the-counter (OTC) product to treat your upset stomach or heartburn, consider whether you should use one of the many antacids that don’t have aspirin.

      Why? Aspirin-containing medicines to treat heartburn, sour stomach, acid indigestion, or upset stomach can cause stomach or intestinal bleeding, especially in some people, warns the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

      Cases of bleeding are rare. In 2009, FDA issued a warning about serious stomach bleeding risk with aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Despite that warning, when FDA reviewed its Adverse Event Reporting System database, it found eight new cases of serious bleeding caused by aspirin-containing antacid products since that 2009 warning. Some of those patients required a blood transfusion.

      Antacids Antacids (aka anti-acids) typically come in two forms - those that absorb or neutralize acids, and those that coat and protect against the acidic discomfort. First Aid Store offers both types of Antacid Remedies, with Pepto Bismol type pink bismuth, and Tums or Maalox type Antacid Tablets available in dispenser boxes and single dose packets. Antacids
      Antacids (aka anti-acids) typically come in two forms - those that absorb or neutralize acids, and those that coat and protect against the acidic discomfort. First Aid Store offers both types of Antacid Remedies, with Pepto Bismol type pink bismuth, and Tums or Maalox type Antacid Tablets available in dispenser boxes and single dose packets.

      “Take a close look at the Drug Facts label, and if the product has aspirin, consider choosing something else for your stomach symptoms,” says Karen Murry Mahoney, MD, Deputy Director of the Division of Nonprescription Drug Products at FDA. “Unless people read the Drug Facts label when they’re looking for stomach symptom relief, they might not even think about the possibility that a stomach medicine could contain aspirin.”

      Mahoney adds: “Today we’re focusing on bleeding risk specifically with antacid-aspirin products used to treat upset stomach or heartburn. We’re not telling people to stop taking aspirin altogether.”

      How will you know what OTC medicine to take to get relief from indigestion? Again, it’s important to read the Drug Facts label. It will tell you if the product contains aspirin, and it lists the risk factors for bleeding. If the medicine has aspirin, consider looking for something else. There are plenty of stomach medicines that don’t contain aspirin.

      pdf icon small Download PDF (233 K)

      On this Subject:

    • Understanding ANSI 2015 Requirements and OSHA Regulations for First Aid Kits

      OSHA (U.S Department of Labor Occupational Safety & Health Administration) is the main federal agency charged with the enforcement of safety and health legislation. OSHA regulations regarding first aid kits are contained in the Code of Federal Regulations under section 29 CFR 1910.151 and in Appendix A. OSHA does not provide specifications for first aid kit contents per se but defines mandatory requirements for availability of kits on worksites. In Appendix A of the OSHA guidelines, ANSI is referenced as the originator of first aid kit specifications and minimum contents requirements (see ANSI requirements in more detail below).


      ANSI Z308.1-2015 / American National Standard Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies are in effect as of June 17, 2016.

      One of the most significant changes from previous editions is the introduction of two classes of first aid kits, based on the assortment and quantity of first aid supplies. Class A kits are designed to deal with most common workplace injuries, such as minor cuts, abrasions and sprains. First aid kits designated as Class B include a broader range and quantity of supplies to deal with injuries in more complex or high-risk environments.

      First aid kits are also designated by Type (I, II, III or IV) depending on the work environment in which they are to be used. For example, Type 1 identifies kits used indoors and permanently mounted to a wall or other structure; Type IV kits are suitable for outdoor use and must pass tests for corrosion, moisture and impact resistance.

      Workplaces vary widely in their degree of hazards, location, size, amount of staff training and availability of professional medical services. With the exception of the Logging Operations standard, 29 CFR 1910.266, OSHA standards do not require specific first-aid-kit contents. This includes the Medical Services and First Aid standards in both general industry and construction, 1910.151 and 1926.50. These OSHA requirements cite ANSI Z308.1 as the minimum required.

      Employers should evaluate their own workplaces to determine whether additional supplies or kits are needed, based on the size and specific hazards of their workplaces.

      The 2015 ANSI revision introduces two classes of first aid kits

      Class A kits with contents designed to deal with most common types of workplace injuries.
      Class B kits with a broader range and quantity of supplies to deal with injuries in more complex or high-risk environments.

      ANSI Z308.1-2015 Required Contents

      In order to be ANSI compliant, First Aid Kits must contain the following components

    • Safety Precautions for the Disabled

      We all need to take precautions regarding several dangers and hazards. While most of us can do so without much hassle, the disabled among us can experience certain challenges in doing so.

      Here are some safety tips that you could make use of or keep in mind when taking care of somebody who is disabled.

      Fire Safety

      People with a disability may not be able to react as quickly as able-bodied people in case of a fire break-out. While it is good that disabled people want to live life on their own terms and be capable of handling all situations, they need to be made aware of precautionary measures.

      Fire-EvacMake use of special fire warning devices for the disabled. People who are hard of hearing or deaf can use smoke alarms with flashing lights or vibrating pads. Some smoke alarms also have strobe lights that can attract the attention of passers-by or neighbors when activated. One can also set up an emergency call system to summon help.

      At least one smoke alarm should be installed on each level of the house. Alarms need to be checked monthly and batteries need to be changed yearly.

      Living on the ground floor will be the safest choice. This will allow the person to reach the exit quicker. People who use scooters or wheelchairs should make sure that they are able to pass through exits without any hindrance. If exits are not accessible, one can consider widening doorways. Installing exit ramps is also a good idea.

      If you have a relative or a friend who has a disability, you must have them practice a fire safety drill or escape plan. As a person with a disability, if you need help, you can get in touch with your local fire department and ask for safety tips and instructions. Some fire safety personnel may even pay you a visit to inspect your home and suggest escape plans.

      Make sure there is a phone right next to your bed so that you can call 911 immediately in case of a fire. You might also need to change certain habits such as drinking and smoking simultaneously. If you happen to fall asleep during such times, your cigarette could slip out of your hand onto the rug and start a fire. Stub out your cigarette in the ash-tray at the first sign of drowsiness.

      Precautions to Take at Workplace

      Both employees as well as the employers need to take steps to ensure safety at the workplace. As a disabled individual, you must make it a point to attend any health and safety programs organized by your company. Whatever guidelines or warnings are set out by the company should be followed. Take part in safety or evacuation drills held by the company. You must speak up if something is being a hindrance to you. Having a comfortable working environment is important so that you can make the best use of your skills.

      As an employer, you will need to assess to what extent an employee’s disability affects his/her work. Take into consideration existing adjustments at the workplace and see if they are appropriate for your employees. You may need to make new adjustments.

      Adjustments needn’t be in the form of just installing low desks, ramps or escalators. Some individuals may only be able to work in a day shift due to their disability so you will need to adjust their shift timings accordingly.

      It will also be the employer’s responsibility to ensure that disabled individuals aren’t being criticized, judged or left out by others in the organization.

      Precaution against Crimes

      It will always help if you stay realistic regarding your physical limitations. Avoid going to places that are deserted. Never take short cuts through alleys, vacant parking lots or wooded areas.

      Pepper Spray 1/2 oz with Key Ring Pouch Pepper Spray 1/2 oz with Key Ring Pouch

      Wherever you go, always appear to be confident and in control of the situation. You don’t want to come across as an easy target. For the same reason, avoid following the same schedule every day.

      You should make a note of all the important places in your neighborhood. These include restaurants or food joints that are easily accessible, hospitals or clinics, stores, public telephones, and police stations. Establish a cordial relationship with your neighbors. If they are watchful, they are likely to make sure you’re safe too.

      You need to have good quality locks installed in your house. Peepholes are an absolute must. If you are wheelchair-bound, peepholes should be at your relative eye level.

      Air Horn - Pocket Size Air Horn - Pocket Size

      Always stay alert when using public transport, travelling to a new place or commuting to/from office. Carry your wallet or handbag close to your body instead of having it dangling by a strap. You should always carry your identity card and medical information with you. This will be of great help in times of emergencies.

      You will also need to be wary of con artists. Always use your common sense and never let desperation or greed overcome it. Avoid investing money or buying things where you need to make quick on-the-spot decisions or pay only cash.

      Conclusion

      Prevention is always better than cure. While we may never be able to reduce crimes or mishaps to nil, we can strive to avoid such instances or be prepared for them in a better way. This takes a little bit of extra effort when it comes to people with disabilities. Identifying problems beforehand and working to get things right way before they go wrong will ensure safety for disabled individuals.

      With National Preparedness Month coming up in September, we recommend you also read:

       Some Content by Julie Howard - See Julie Howard's blog @ Safety.com

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