First Aid Store

Guess What We Sell?™ ...a lot more than First Aid

877.534.7782
Online 24/7+Friendly Toll Free Service 6-6 Pacific/9-9 Eastern (Monday-Friday)
Search Site

    Fire Safety

    • Deck the Halls - Safely

      Decorating homes and businesses is a long-standing tradition around the holiday season. Unfortunately, these same decorations may increase your chances of fire.

      Learn more:

      Check out this Holiday Fire Safety public service announcement from FEMA:

    • Wildfire

      Wildfire. As the temperatures rise, and things dry out (especially considering the current drought issues) wildfire risk rises everywhere.

      Some reminders about Wildfire Safety:

      Do you know what to do if you spot a wildfire?wildfire-spot-it

      You should walk or drive away from the fire immediately and call 911 to report it! Weather conditions and the type of ground cover (trees, dry grass, etc) can make the fire change direction quickly so it is important that you stay far away from the blaze. Leaving the area will also make it easier for firefighters and rescue workers to get to the scene.

      www.firewise.org #WildfireSafety

    • Safety Precautions for the Disabled

      We all need to take precautions regarding several dangers and hazards. While most of us can do so without much hassle, the disabled among us can experience certain challenges in doing so.

      Here are some safety tips that you could make use of or keep in mind when taking care of somebody who is disabled.

      Fire Safety

      People with a disability may not be able to react as quickly as able-bodied people in case of a fire break-out. While it is good that disabled people want to live life on their own terms and be capable of handling all situations, they need to be made aware of precautionary measures.

      Fire-EvacMake use of special fire warning devices for the disabled. People who are hard of hearing or deaf can use smoke alarms with flashing lights or vibrating pads. Some smoke alarms also have strobe lights that can attract the attention of passers-by or neighbors when activated. One can also set up an emergency call system to summon help.

      At least one smoke alarm should be installed on each level of the house. Alarms need to be checked monthly and batteries need to be changed yearly.

      Living on the ground floor will be the safest choice. This will allow the person to reach the exit quicker. People who use scooters or wheelchairs should make sure that they are able to pass through exits without any hindrance. If exits are not accessible, one can consider widening doorways. Installing exit ramps is also a good idea.

      If you have a relative or a friend who has a disability, you must have them practice a fire safety drill or escape plan. As a person with a disability, if you need help, you can get in touch with your local fire department and ask for safety tips and instructions. Some fire safety personnel may even pay you a visit to inspect your home and suggest escape plans.

      Make sure there is a phone right next to your bed so that you can call 911 immediately in case of a fire. You might also need to change certain habits such as drinking and smoking simultaneously. If you happen to fall asleep during such times, your cigarette could slip out of your hand onto the rug and start a fire. Stub out your cigarette in the ash-tray at the first sign of drowsiness.

      Precautions to Take at Workplace

      Both employees as well as the employers need to take steps to ensure safety at the workplace. As a disabled individual, you must make it a point to attend any health and safety programs organized by your company. Whatever guidelines or warnings are set out by the company should be followed. Take part in safety or evacuation drills held by the company. You must speak up if something is being a hindrance to you. Having a comfortable working environment is important so that you can make the best use of your skills.

      As an employer, you will need to assess to what extent an employee’s disability affects his/her work. Take into consideration existing adjustments at the workplace and see if they are appropriate for your employees. You may need to make new adjustments.

      Adjustments needn’t be in the form of just installing low desks, ramps or escalators. Some individuals may only be able to work in a day shift due to their disability so you will need to adjust their shift timings accordingly.

      It will also be the employer’s responsibility to ensure that disabled individuals aren’t being criticized, judged or left out by others in the organization.

      Precaution against Crimes

      It will always help if you stay realistic regarding your physical limitations. Avoid going to places that are deserted. Never take short cuts through alleys, vacant parking lots or wooded areas.

      Pepper Spray 1/2 oz with Key Ring Pouch Pepper Spray 1/2 oz with Key Ring Pouch

      Wherever you go, always appear to be confident and in control of the situation. You don’t want to come across as an easy target. For the same reason, avoid following the same schedule every day.

      You should make a note of all the important places in your neighborhood. These include restaurants or food joints that are easily accessible, hospitals or clinics, stores, public telephones, and police stations. Establish a cordial relationship with your neighbors. If they are watchful, they are likely to make sure you’re safe too.

      You need to have good quality locks installed in your house. Peepholes are an absolute must. If you are wheelchair-bound, peepholes should be at your relative eye level.

      Air Horn - Pocket Size Air Horn - Pocket Size

      Always stay alert when using public transport, travelling to a new place or commuting to/from office. Carry your wallet or handbag close to your body instead of having it dangling by a strap. You should always carry your identity card and medical information with you. This will be of great help in times of emergencies.

      You will also need to be wary of con artists. Always use your common sense and never let desperation or greed overcome it. Avoid investing money or buying things where you need to make quick on-the-spot decisions or pay only cash.

      Conclusion

      Prevention is always better than cure. While we may never be able to reduce crimes or mishaps to nil, we can strive to avoid such instances or be prepared for them in a better way. This takes a little bit of extra effort when it comes to people with disabilities. Identifying problems beforehand and working to get things right way before they go wrong will ensure safety for disabled individuals.

      With National Preparedness Month coming up in September, we recommend you also read:

       Some Content by Julie Howard - See Julie Howard's blog @ Safety.com

    • Candle Fire & Burn Prevention

      Candles add a warm and romantic glow to an evening. Emergency Candles are popular for Disaster Survival & Blackouts as well. But Candles are hazards, too.

      Consider using battery-operated or electric flameless candles that can look, smell and feel like real candles - without the flame.

      ~ Never use candles in sleeping or bedroom areas.

      ~ Keep at least 12 inches away from anything that can burn.

      ~ Keep out of reach of children and pets.

      ~ Extinguish candles after each use and before going to bed.

      ~ Never leave burning candles unattended.

      The MayDay Industries Emergency Gear Survival Candle Burns ~ 36 Hours. We offer the Survival Candle at First Aid Store™ This Emergency Candle Burns ~ 36 Hours!

      • Price: $6.65 - In stock
      • Brand: Mayday
      • Product ID: L22A
    • Portable Fireplaces... Warm & Cozy, or Burnt?

      Portable Fireplaces: Tips for Staying Cozy and Safe

      Portable fuel-burning fireplaces have become a popular way for people to heat their homes during winter months. However, if not used properly, these devices can be dangerous and pose a serious fire hazard.

      According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), half of all home heating fires occur in December, January, and February. Learn how to “Put a Freeze on Winter Fires.” Before you snuggle up to a portable fireplace, keep these NFPA safety tips in mind:

      • Make sure the fireplace has an Underwriters’ Laboratory (UL) listing. This ensures the product has been tested for safety;
      • Read and follow the manufacturer’s instructions closely;
      • Keep the area where you're using the fireplace well ventilated;
      • Do not use the fireplace in sleeping areas; and
      • Light the fireplace using a utility lighter or long match.
      • Never use outdoor fire pits or "chimineas" inside

      As with all heating equipment, space is important! Create a “safe zone” around the device by keeping children, pets, and anything that can burn at least three feet away.matches

      More Winter Fire Safety Tips:

      To find out more information and protection tips on portable fireplaces, go to the NFPA website.

    • Firefighting Equipment

      Firefighting Equipment Training

      FireFighting

      Fighting fires can be one of the most challenging jobs out there. Getting a handle on conditions and dousing blazes quickly and effectively takes preparation and training. While there are several ways stations can tackle these challenges, a key area every firefighter should work on is equipment training. Gone are the days when a simple hose and axe were the only tools of the trade as there is now plenty of firefighting and rescue equipment that responders need to bring into the field to be effective. If you want to make sure your station is ready for any challenges they may face, follow these basic training suggestions.

      Have an Active Approach

      First and foremost you should always take a hands-on approach when it comes to training. Every time a new piece of equipment is added to your station it will do you and your team a great service to actively spend time familiarizing yourself with it. Learning about the function of every piece of gear can help you out, but don’t limit yourself to just reading instruction labels. Be hands-on with your equipment by creating live training activities for your entire station so you will know all the capabilities of your gear before you put it in action.

      Always Have Equipment at the Ready

      Not every piece of equipment that retailers offer will be needed for every type of blaze. You may see long stretches where an axe or radio may sit unused. Don’t let these pieces collect dust. Set every piece of gear up so that it is quickly accessible and make sure each is constantly in working order and ready to be taken into the field so you can focus on the task at hand, not whether equipment will do its job.

      FireFighting-2

      Incorporate Gear into Fitness Routines

      Speaking of being ready, you will want to make sure your most vital piece of equipment—your body—is equally up to the task of fighting flames. While exercise and fitness regimens are a standard practice for many responders, you can take it one step further by incorporating vital gear into routines. Rather than going for a jog, try hiking around while wearing a respirator tank. Lift ladders and axes instead of only weights. This will not only help you to stay in shape, but it can help you get used to the feel of equipment in your hands. You’ll be better able to quickly pick up and use pieces when time is vitally important.

      Basic Fire and Evacuation equipment is available to business and the public as well Basic Fire and Evacuation equipment is available to business and the public as well

      Don’t Forget the Basics

      Last but not least, it’s important to remember the basics of equipment handling protocols whether you are a rookie firefighter or a veteran. This might seem like a no brainer, but when you are out in the field trying to juggle multiple pieces in a fast paced situation it is easy to slip up and forget something. Take the time to review the basics of each piece of equipment when sitting around the station. A little reviewing between calls can help you stay on top of chaotic situations.

      Similar Articles: How to Maintain Fire Fighting EquipmentWhy First Aid for Burns Is Critical Firefighting EquipmentBurn Safety for FirefightersHow To Protect Your Home From WildfiresWildfire Safety PrioritiesFire Safe HomeFire Safety for Kids (Infographic): Facts, Prevention, Preparedness & Tips

      Author Bio: Carolyn Clarke is a proud mother of two from Omaha, Nebraska. When not working as a freelance writer, she enjoys creating fun DIY activities for her children and volunteering at her local pet shelter.

    • How to Maintain Fire Fighting Equipment

      Fighting fires is one of the most dangerous jobs on the market. Making a very small mental mistake can have drastic consequences. On top of that, your equipment must be in prime shape every time you go out on the job. If one piece of your turnout gear malfunctions or has an issue, you can be in very hot water. Every firefighter must take utmost care to ensure that all equipment is ready to go before putting it on.

      BlazePersonal Protective Equipment Upkeep

      It’s hard to underestimate the value of regularly cleaning, inspecting, and maintaining every piece of your personal protective equipment. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has an entire section on the recommended standards for Selection, Care, and Maintenance of Structural Fire Fighting Protective Ensembles. Here you can find outlines of regular cleaning cycles, as well as guides on how to repair contaminated or damaged equipment. You can leave nothing to chance when it comes to keeping your fire protective equipment in shape. It should also be noted that owning the highest quality turnout gear is the first line of defense—such as the kind you would find at L.N. Curtis & Sons.

      When Do You Have to Clean Your Equipment?

      If you find yourself asking something like, “Is there any damage here?” or, “I wonder if I got this contaminated at the fire?”—stop yourself right there. The top rule of thumb when it comes to cleaning turnout gear is this: If you use it, clean it.

      That means that even if you don’t think you contaminated your suit in any way on the job, just go through the cleaning cycle anyway. This may seem inconvenient and time-consuming, but let’s calculate the risk of what can happen if you’re wrong. As you know, you can risk equipment malfunction and compromised turnout gear. Besides the possibility of keeping you from performing your duties to the fullest, you risk extreme injury from heat and fire, including possibly fatal injuries.

      Check Your Tools

      Fire-EvacIf you think the whole of your job takes place at the fire site, you’re wrong. Half of the job is preparation. If you don’t properly maintain your equipment and check the functionality of your tools before you go out to a fire, you’re only doing half of your job, besides putting yourself in incredible danger. Just like with your turnout gear, your tools should be tested and retested regularly. How regularly? Use this little motto: If you touch it, test it.

      The key to maintaining all of your fire fighting equipment is to instill in yourself mental discipline. If you stick to your program of cleaning and checking your fire gear after every time you touch or wear it, you’ll prevent some careless disasters when it really counts.


      Author Bio: Carolyn Clarke is a proud mother of two from Omaha, Nebraska. When not working as a freelance writer, she enjoys creating fun DIY activities for her children and volunteering at her local pet shelter.

      Other Articles by Carolyn Clarke: Burn Safety for FirefightersWhy First Aid for Burns Is Critical Firefighting Equipment

    • Why First Aid for Burns Is Critical Firefighting Equipment

      Firefighters and First Responders know...

      While your gear is carefully designed to protect you when responding to a fire, there are definitely times in every firefighter’s career when a burn simply cannot be avoided. You may even have to assist someone else who is burned until they can receive care. Whether the burn is more severe and requires extensive medical attention, or is on the less severe end of the spectrum and can be cared for at home, all firefighters need to know the protocol for burn treatment. Knowing how to respond to a burn as soon as it occurs can provide a better prognosis and encourage healing—or even help save a life.

      Flame-BurstThe Importance of First Aid Training

      While advances in technology mean that firefighting gear is becoming more advanced every day, they are not always failsafe when it comes to protecting you from burns. In addition to knowing basics like CPR, you may very well find yourself having to treat victims of a fire who have suffered burns before they are able to receive help from medical personnel. You would not consider life-saving pieces of equipment, such as your hose or your boots, to be expendable, and first aid should definitely be included in that category. As a firefighter, people depend on you for lifesaving assistance, and you always want to be in the position to help them as much as possible.

      The First Aid Supplies You Need

      First-Responder-TraumaAs a part of your first aid readiness, you should make sure that you have everything you need to administer assistance, starting with first aid supplies. If you need to stock up on the essentials, L.N. Curtis carries EMS supplies such as gloves, trauma bags, medical backpacks, skin cleansers, and lightweight first aid kits. Make it a routine to stock your first aid response kit. Double check that tools like scissors are in working order.

      Where to Learn More About Treating Burns

      Your department should offer training and resources for you to learn the basic first aid skills that will be required of you on the job. However, should you find that you’d like to learn more about first aid and treating burns, you should not hesitate to increase your knowledge base with reputable resources.

      Author Bio: Carolyn Clarke is a freelance writer from Omaha, Nebraska. She has written for clients like Demand Media and the Omaha World-Herald. When she isn’t working on DIY projects with her two daughters, Lauryn and Lila, she’s volunteering at her local pet shelter.

    • Burn Safety for Firefighters

      FIRE! First Aid Store will get you prepared with Fire & Emergency Evacuation Gear and Supply - From Fire Axes and Fire Escape Ladders to Barricade “Caution” Tape, Fire Extinguishers, Fire Escape Masks and Kidde Digital Carbon & Fire Alarms - we've got your Emergency and Fire Evacuation Supplies in one easy location and at great prices! FIRE! First Aid Store will get you prepared with Fire & Emergency Evacuation Gear and Supply - From Fire Axes and Fire Escape Ladders to Barricade “Caution” Tape, Fire Extinguishers, Fire Escape Masks and Kidde Digital Carbon & Fire Alarms - we've got your Emergency and Fire Evacuation Supplies in one easy location and at great prices!

      We've shared a lot in our past articles, about Fire Safety, Burn First Aid, and even Firefighters. Here is a great contribution from Carolyn Clarke about Burn Safety for Firefighters - remember, while rescuing us, they have risks as well.

       

      Firefighters are among the toughest workers in the world, moving and thinking fast, laboring under intense pressure, and often facing immediate and serious danger in order to stabilize emergency situations and save lives. In the face of this kind of daily danger, you need to know everything you can in order to protect yourself from burns while you’re responding to a call. Here are some key tips for burn safety for firefighters, so that you can keep yourself as safe as possible when you’re on the job.

      The Best Burn Prevention

      The best burn prevention starts with the best gear. If you’re a firefighter, you need equipment that works as hard as you do. When you’re responding to a call, you don’t want to second guess whether your gear is up to snuff. Luckily, firefighters today are benefiting from superior technology and design from boots to headgear, and everything in between. Goggles with aggressive ventilation, like the CMC Rescue ESS Striketeam Rescue Goggle are an example of the new ways companies are thinking about smart, highly protective equipment for firefighters. Boots like Globe’s Superlite combine grip, flexibility, and flame and water-resistant fabric to provide top notch protection. Both of these products are available at L.N. Curtis, a trusted name when it comes to firefighter equipment, gear, and supplies.

      Burn-BabyCleaning and Maintaining Equipment is Key

      Once you have trustworthy, durable, and flexible equipment, be sure to do your best to keep it in good repair so that it can continue to work hard. Some companies specialize in inspection and maintenance services and will help keep your gear tough. Also, try to find a company that also offers rescue tool inspection and maintenance to make sure your tools and equipment are performing as well as you need them to.

      Burn Response Training and Care

      At the end of the day, it is always prudent to know how to respond to burns with the appropriate level of attention and care. If you have not received burn or first aid training recently, it may be time to refresh your memory in order to remind yourself of the basics. Whether you are assisting a neighbor, a fellow firefighter, or tending to your own steam burn at home, it is always a good idea to know the medical protocol for handling burns of any severity in order to promote safe and effective healing.

      First Aid Store offers the best brands of Burn First Aid & Burn Care Products and Supplies: From our Burn First Aid Kits to Burn Sprays, Burn Care Products and S.T.A.R.T Burn Care Unit. We offer Fire Blankets, Water Gel Wraps, Water Gel, Burn Cream & Dressings. Everything you need to treat burns! First Aid Store offers the best brands of Burn First Aid & Burn Care Products and Supplies: From our Burn First Aid Kits to Burn Sprays, Burn Care Products and S.T.A.R.T Burn Care Unit. We offer Fire Blankets, Water Gel Wraps, Water Gel, Burn Cream & Dressings. Everything you need to treat burns!

      Author Bio: Carolyn Clarke is a freelance writer from Omaha, Nebraska. She has written for clients like Demand Media and the Omaha World-Herald. When she isn’t working on DIY projects with her two daughters, Lauryn and Lila, she’s volunteering at her local pet shelter.

    • Fire Safety for Kids (Infographic): Facts, Prevention, Preparedness & Tips

      As Parents, Educators, and Awesome Bystanders, we all need to know about Children's First Aid and Child Safety.

      fire-safety-for-kids-infographic This fire safety for kids infographic was made to keep your children safe from fire. It was made with the purpose of teaching kids and parents how to prevent fire, how to prepare against a fire and what to do in case a fire breaks out. We encourage everyone to be aware of its content.

      Another preparedness point is Home Fire Safety... practice it, but also educate! Here's a great infographic to print or share from our friends at Contractor Quotes:

    Items 1 to 10 of 67 total

    Page:
    1. 1
    2. 2
    3. 3
    4. 4
    5. 5
    6. ...
    7. 7