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    Bloodborne Pathogens / BBP

    • Who needs Bloodborne Pathogen protection and training?

      bloodborne-airborne-banner_3Who needs Bloodborne Pathogen training? Anyone who may come into contact with Blood or Other Potentially Infectious Materials (OPIM), as a part  of their work. Even as a collateral duty.

      Employer Responsibilities:

      • BBP-KitDevelop a written Exposure Control Plan
      • Develop Engineering Controls
      • Provide Personal Protective Equipment including Spill PIck Up kits or supplies when appropriate.
      • Offer training in, and monitoring of proper work practices.
      • Develop procedures to evaluate circumstances surrounding Exposure Incidents.
      • Offer the Hepatitis B (HBV) vaccine to all employees with designated exposure risk.
      • Provide labels and signs.

      Employee Responsibilities:

      BioUse PPE whenever the possibility of exposure to blood or body fluids exists. This equipment must not allow blood or OPIM to pass through to the employee’s clothes, skin, eyes, or mouth.

      When handling materials or individuals contaminated with blood or OPIM, rubber gloves must be worn. Hypoallergenic gloves must be made available for individuals with allergic reactions to latex products.

      Single-use gloves must be replaced as soon as possible after they have been contaminated or if they become torn or punctured.

      Latex or rubber gloves should never be washed for reuse.

      Rubber gloves are not sufficient protection for the handling of contaminated sharp objects such as needles or broken glass. For these functions, use heavy gloves, tongs, or other appropriate equipment that eliminates the risk of puncture and exposure. Other examples of personal protective equipment can include:

      • PLASTIC VISORS

      • HALF-FACE MASKS

      • FULL BODY SUIT/GOWN

      • EYE GOGGLES

      • CPR MASKS

      First Aid Store is proud to offer Pathogen Protection including Bloodborne Protection such as BBP Kits and Spill Clean-Up Kits. Other Blood borne pathogen infection control and Airborne Pathogen Protection supplies such as Antimicrobial and Germicidal Wipes, Antiseptic Solutions and Disinfectant Sprays, Fluid Control Solidifiers and Biohazard Bags, Gowns, Booties and Masks - even Personal Protection Kits & Sharps Disposal. First Aid Store is proud to offer Pathogen Protection including Bloodborne Protection such as BBP Kits and Spill Clean-Up Kits. Other Blood borne pathogen infection control and Airborne Pathogen Protection supplies such as Antimicrobial and Germicidal Wipes, Antiseptic Solutions and Disinfectant Sprays, Fluid Control Solidifiers and Biohazard Bags, Gowns, Booties and Masks - even Personal Protection Kits & Sharps Disposal.

      The type and amount of Personal Protective Equipment used should be appropriate to the exposure risk. Although your employer is responsible for providing you with PPE, it is your responsibility as an employee to:

      • Use PPE correctly and whenever necessary,
      • Inform your employer of any PPE improvements that you feel must be made to ensure your safety on the job.

      Bloodborne Pathogens Training

      Bloodborne Pathogen Safety Training

      Bloodborne Pathogens

      2 Hours
      $16.50 - $29 per student
      2 Year Certification
      Includes Student Handbook, Certification Card, Reminder Pen, & More

      | Curriculum | Quote |

    • 5 Things You Really Need to Know About Zika

      Outbreaks of Zika have been reported in tropical Africa, Southeast Asia, the Pacific Islands, and most recently in the Americas. Because the mosquitoes that spread Zika virus are found throughout the world, it is likely that outbreaks will continue to spread. According to the CDC; here are 5 things that you really need to know about the Zika virus.

      Zika is primarily spread through the bite of an infected mosquito.

      Many areas in the United States have the type of mosquitoes that can become infected with and spread Zika virus. To date, there have been no reports of Zika being spread by mosquitoes in the continental United States. However, cases have been reported in travelers to the United States. With the recent outbreaks in the Americas, the number of Zika cases among travelers visiting or returning to the United States will likely increase.

      These mosquitoes are aggressive daytime biters. They also bite at night. The mosquitoes that spread Zika virus also spread dengue and chikungunya viruses.

      The best way to prevent Zika is to prevent mosquito bites.

      Protect yourself from mosquitoes by wearing long-sleeved shirts and long pants. Stay in places with air conditioning or that use window and door screens to keep mosquitoes outside.  Sleep under a mosquito bed net if air conditioned or screened rooms are not available or if sleeping outdoors.

      Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents. When used as directed, these insect repellents are proven safe and effective even for pregnant and breastfeeding women.Zika_prevent-mosquito-bites

      Learn more about DEET & Picaridin.

      Do not use insect repellent on babies younger than 2 months old. Dress your child in clothing that covers arms and legs. Cover crib, stroller, and baby carrier with mosquito netting.

      Read more about how to protect yourself from mosquito bites.

      Infection with Zika during pregnancy may be linked to birth defects in babies.

      Waiting for a baby. Close-up of young pregnant woman touching her abdomen while sitting on the couchZika virus can pass from a mother to the fetus during pregnancy, but we are unsure of how often this occurs. There have been reports of a serious birth defect of the brain called microcephaly (a birth defect in which the size of a baby’s head is smaller than expected for age and sex) in babies of mothers who were infected with Zika virus while pregnant. Additional studies are needed to determine the degree to which Zika is linked with microcephaly. More lab testing and other studies are planned to learn more about the risks of Zika virus infection during pregnancy.

      We expect that the course of Zika virus disease in pregnant women is similar to that in the general population. No evidence exists to suggest that pregnant women are more susceptible or experience more severe disease during pregnancy.

      Because of the possible association between Zika infection and microcephaly, pregnant women should strictly follow steps to prevent mosquito bites.

      Pregnant women should delay travel to areas where Zika is spreading.

      Until more is known, CDC recommends that pregnant women consider postponing travel to any area where Zika virus is spreading. If you must travel to one of these areas, talk to your healthcare provider first and strictly follow steps to prevent mosquito bites during the trip.

      If you have a male partner who lives in or has traveled to an area where Zika is spreading, either do not have sex or use condoms the right way every time during your pregnancy.

      For women trying to get pregnant, before you or your male partner travel, talk to your healthcare provider about your plans to become pregnant and the risk of Zika virus infection. You and your male partner should strictly follow steps to prevent mosquito bites during the trip.

      Returning travelers infected with Zika can spread the virus through mosquito bites.

      Man using insect repellantDuring the first week of infection, Zika virus can be found in the blood and passed from an infected person to a mosquito through mosquito bites. The infected mosquito must live long enough for the virus to multiply and for the mosquito to bite another person.

      Protect your family, friends, neighbors, and community! If you have traveled to a country where Zika has been found, make sure you take the same measures to protect yourself from mosquito bites at home as you would while traveling. Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants , use insect repellant, and stay in places with air conditioning or that use window and door screens to keep mosquitoes outside.

      For more information on the Zika virus, read Zikaand for the latest updates, visit www.cdc.gov/zika.

    • Exsanguination

      DIrect-PRessureWhat is Exsanguination? It is the severe loss of blood - it is life threatening and can lead to death in as little as 5 minutes if not addressed correctly.

      We'll be talking about the importance of immediate bystander action to stop blood loss over the next few weeks, but want to lead in with sharing some past articles on the matter:

    • Hepatitis Updates

      In our business, BBP (Bloodborne Pathogens) focuses often on HIV, and concern over transmission through fist aid caregiving and body fluid spill cleanup.

      Hepatitis, however, is a far more common risk.

      Pathogen Protection including Bloodborne Protection such as BBP Kits and Spill Clean-Up Kits. Other Blood borne pathogen infection control and Airborne Pathogen Protection supplies such as Antimicrobial and Germicidal Wipes, Antiseptic Solutions and Disinfectant Sprays, Fluid Control Solidifiers and Biohazard Bags, Gowns, Booties and Masks - even Personal Protection Kits & Sharps Disposal. Also see our OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Training Materials Pathogen Protection including Bloodborne Protection such as BBP Kits and Spill Clean-Up Kits. Other Blood borne pathogen infection control and Airborne Pathogen Protection supplies such as Antimicrobial and Germicidal Wipes, Antiseptic Solutions and Disinfectant Sprays, Fluid Control Solidifiers and Biohazard Bags, Gowns, Booties and Masks - even Personal Protection Kits & Sharps Disposal. Also see our OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Training Materials

      Viral Hepatitis Updates from CDC  

      HCV Testing Makes Public Health Sense

      In response to Is widespread screening for hepatitis C justified?, Drs. Jonathan Mermin and John W. Ward of CDC wanted to set the record straight on a number of key points including “the CDC and USPSTF recommendations for one-time testing of persons born during 1945-1965 are based on sound evidence that HCV testing linked to care is beneficial for patients, cost effective, and with the potential of averting over 120,000 deaths from HCV.”
      http://www.bmj.com/content/350/bmj.g7809/rr-11

      Read about BBP & Universal Precautions 

      WHO issues its first hepatitis B treatment guidelines
      WHO issued its first-ever guidance for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B. Worldwide, some 240 million people have chronic hepatitis B virus with the highest rates of infection in Africa and Asia. People with chronic hepatitis B infection are at increased risk of dying from cirrhosis and liver cancer. Key recommendations include: the use of a few simple non-invasive tests to assess the stage of liver disease to help identify who needs treatment; prioritizing treatment for those with cirrhosis - the most advanced stage of liver disease; the use of two safe and highly effective medicines for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B; and regular monitoring using simple tests for early detection of liver cancer, to assess whether treatment is working, and if treatment can be stopped.
      http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/154590/1/9789241549059_eng.pdf?ua=1&ua=1

      New Hepatitis C & Injection Drug Use Fact Sheet
      CDC has developed a fact sheet on Hepatitis C and injection drug use. The fact sheet includes an overview of hepatitis C including symptoms, testing, transmission, prevention, treatment, and reinfection.
      http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/HCV/PDFs/FactSheet-PWID.pdf

    • Universal Precautions

      What Are Universal Precautions?

      Part of assessing the scene in First Aid Response also includes checking for hazards associated with exposure to infectious materials.

      BioUniversal Precautions is an approach to infection control.  According to the concept of Universal Precautions, all blood and certain body fluids should be treated as if they contain potentially infectious bloodborne pathogens.  Bloodborne pathogens are bacteria or viruses that exist in blood, and can cause disease in humans who are exposed to them.  A few examples of bloodborne pathogens include H.I.V. (the disease that causes AIDS), Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C.  These diseases can be transmitted by any blood-to-blood contact, or by exposure to an individual’s eyes, nose, or mouth.  Because of the risk of bloodborne pathogens, individuals engaging in CPR or First Aid activities should follow the guidelines of Universal Precautions, set forth by O.S.H.A. and the U.S. Department of Labor:

      BBP-KitAvoid contact with the blood or body fluids of an injury victim while providing care.  When possible, use latex or some form of protective gloves, CPR masks, and other appropriate articles of Personal Protective Equipment. Wash hands, and any exposed area with soap and warm water immediately after engaging in First Aid practices, and immediately report any suspected exposure incident to a physician for evaluation and treatment. The basis behind Universal Precautions is that it may be difficult or impossible to tell if an individual may have an infectious disease.   ~ Always consider Latex sensitivity on the part of the victim, or the rescuer ~

      With this in mind, it is important to treat ALL patients as if they are known to be infectious.  Universal Precautions means that personal protective equipment, cautious treatment procedures, proper cleanup, and conscientious reporting must be observed

      EVERY TIME with EVERYBODY

      Pathogen Protection including Bloodborne Protection such as BBP Kits and Spill Clean-Up Kits. Other Blood borne pathogen infection control and Airborne Pathogen Protection supplies such as Antimicrobial and Germicidal Wipes, Antiseptic Solutions and Disinfectant Sprays, Fluid Control Solidifiers and Biohazard Bags, Gowns, Booties and Masks - even Personal Protection Kits & Sharps Disposal. Also see our OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Training Materials Pathogen Protection including Bloodborne Protection such as BBP Kits and Spill Clean-Up Kits. Other Blood borne pathogen infection control and Airborne Pathogen Protection supplies such as Antimicrobial and Germicidal Wipes, Antiseptic Solutions and Disinfectant Sprays, Fluid Control Solidifiers and Biohazard Bags, Gowns, Booties and Masks - even Personal Protection Kits & Sharps Disposal. Also see our OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Training Materials
    • National Institutes for Health discharges Ebola Patient: #Ebola

      NIH discharge of Ebola patient from its Clinical Center Special Clinical Studies Unit

      NIH officials briefed reporters Today, in front of the NIH Clinical Center, about the discharge of Nina Pham, the Dallas nurse who was admitted to the NIH Clinical Center on October 16 with Ebola virus disease, and is now virus free.

      NIH informed viewers that there was no risk of Ms. Pham spreading the infection to others. Only infected persons currently exhibiting Ebola Symptoms are infectious. They stated unequivocally that she is cured of Ebola.

      They reminded all that States, not just the CDC have a say in release guidelines as well as containment.

      NIH administered no experimental Drugs to Nina Pham, she recovered through normal symptomatic care and personal strength. She did have a plasma transfusion, but there is no way of singling out any single factor that particularly contributed to her recovery.

      Representatives stated that they like to think of the  National Institutes of Health as the "National Institutes of HOPE".

      The patient is free of Ebola Virus, determined through multiple examinations and tests.
      They called Nurse Pham, Extraordinary, Lovely, and Courageous. They further recognized the remarkable work of the Doctors and Nurses at Texas Presbyterian Hospital before transfer to NIH, and at NIH.

      Nurse Nina Pham will now return to Texas to resume her life, and has asked that everyone respect her need for privacy and time with her family while regaining her strength. NIH reminded all that States, not just the CDC have a say in release guidelines as well as containment.

      NIH refused to disclose Ms. Pham's travel arrangements to avoid Media disrespect for her privacy.

      Remember that Ebola is NOT Airborne.

      Other Questions and Answers on Ebola

      Participants included:

      Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., Director of the National Institutes of Health
      Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., Ph.D., Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
      H. Clifford (Cliff) Lane, M.D., NIAID Clinical Director
      John I. Gallin, M.D., Director, NIH Clinical Center
      Tara Palmore, M.D., Director, Hospital Epidemiologist, NIH Clinical Center and Director, Infectious Diseases Training Program, NIAID
      Rick Davey, M.D., Deputy Clinical Director, NIAID Division of Clinical Research

      About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.govNIH...Turning Discovery Into Health®

      CDC says to use these disinfectants against Ebola

      Pathogen Protection including Bloodborne Protection such as BBP Kits and Spill Clean-Up Kits. Other Blood borne pathogen infection control and Airborne Pathogen Protection supplies such as Antimicrobial and Germicidal Wipes, Antiseptic Solutions and Disinfectant Sprays, Fluid Control Solidifiers and Biohazard Bags, Gowns, Booties and Masks - even Personal Protection Kits & Sharps Disposal. Also see our OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Training Materials 
      American Red Cross Germ Guard Personal Protection Packs, N95 Particulate Respirators (N-95 Masks), Procedural Masks, Surgical Masks & Protective Bird Flu Kit.
      Sanizide Plus environmental surface germicidal solution, available in spray bottles and gallon jugs. Proven effective against a wide variety of bacterial and viral pathogens.
      Safetec Personal Antimicrobial Wipes available bulk or boxed - Dispenser canister of SaniZide Plus Germicidal Wipes. Tough microbe killing substances such as Cholroxylenol (PCMX) and Ethyl Alcohol.
      Personal Germicidal Wipes individually wrapped and in dispenser canisters - SaniZide Plus Germicidal Wipes - These pre-saturated, hard surface wipes kill TB, MRSA, VRE, E Coli and more in 10 minutes and HIV-1 in 2 minutes.
      Personal Protection, PPE, Bloodborne Pathogen kits, Bodily Fluid Spill Kits, and BBP kits supplies including Gloves, Bonnets, Face Shields and other bloodborne pathogen cleanup kit items to protect rescuers from Blood and OPIM.
      Disposable Gowns, Disposable Shoe Covers, bonnets, masks and eye shield - designed to protect rescuers attending to causalities or cleaning up bodily fluids and bio-hazardous materials.
      Personal Protection from exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens and Bodily Fluid Spill, Gloves, Disposable Shoe Covers & Masks.
      Sharps Disposal Containers available in 1 Quart and 5 Quart sizes as well as wire and lockable wall brackets for sharps containers. SharpSentinel containers designed to provide cost-effective sharps disposal together with the safety features you require.
      SaniZide solutions and Antiseptic Bio Hand Cleaner Gel available in bottles and sprays. Kills Bacteria and Fights Infections.
      From the American Red Cross Fluid Spill Emergency Responder Pack to Biohazard Scoops, Biohazard Bags, and Disposable Towels - we have the bodily fluid spill clean up products you need.
      Red-Z Fluid Control Solidifiers by Safetec - available in individual packs & Fluid Control Solidifier Shakers.
    • Ebola vaccine

      Human testing of a second investigational Ebola vaccine candidate is under way at the National Institutes of Health’s Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.

      Researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) are conducting the early phase trial to evaluate the vaccine, called VSV-ZEBOV, for safety and its ability to generate an immune system response in healthy adults who are given two intramuscular doses, called a prime-boost strategy. The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) is simultaneously testing the vaccine candidate as a single dose at its Clinical Trials Center in Silver Spring, Maryland.

      “The need for a vaccine to protect against Ebola infection is urgent”

      —Anthony S. Fauci, M.D.
      Director, NIAID

      “The need for a vaccine to protect against Ebola infection is urgent,” said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. “NIH welcomes the opportunity to collaborate with the U.S. Department of Defense to conduct human clinical tests of another promising — and hopefully, successful — Ebola vaccine candidate.”

      NIAID researchers include principal investigator Richard T. Davey, M.D., and co-investigator John Beigel, M.D., of NIAID’s Division of Intramural Research, Early human testing of another investigational Ebola vaccine co-developed by NIAID and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) began in early September. Initial data on safety and immunogenicity (the capacity to generate an immune response) from clinical trials of the NIAID/GSK Ebola vaccine are expected by the end of 2014.

      The VSV-ZEBOV vaccine candidate was developed by researchers at the Public Health Agency of Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory. It has been licensed to NewLink Genetics Corp through its wholly owned subsidiary BioProtection Systems, both based in Ames, Iowa.

      “Canada has long been a world leader in Ebola research and innovation. Scientists at Canada's National Microbiology Lab developed this Ebola vaccine, following years of hard work. We hope the clinical trial at the National Institutes of Health proves to be safe and effective, so that the Canadian Ebola vaccine can be used as a global resource to help save lives and end this complex outbreak in West Africa," said Canada’s Minister of Health Rona Ambrose.

      “We are pleased to recognize the extraordinary work of our partners to move the VSV-ZEBOV vaccine candidate from preclinical development to clinical testing in a matter of weeks rather than years. This level of support has been and will continue to be a critical asset in the ongoing process of evaluating and potentially bringing this investigational product to broader use in the fight against Ebola virus,” said Charles Link, M.D., chief scientific officer and CEO, NewLink Genetics.

      VSV-Zebov is based in part on a genetically engineered version of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), which primarily affects rodents, cattle, swine and horses. Human VSV infections are rare and generally produce three to four days of mild illness. In the VSV-ZEBOV investigational vaccine, the gene for the outer protein of the vesicular stomatitis virus has been replaced with a segment of the gene for the outer protein of the Zaire Ebola virus species. The investigational VSV-ZEBOV vaccine cannot cause a vaccinated individual to become infected with Ebola.

      The NIH Phase 1 clinical trial of the VSV-ZEBOV vaccine candidate will enroll 39 healthy adults aged 18 to 65 years. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of three groups with 13 participants each. In each group, 10 participants will receive the investigational VSV-ZEBOV vaccine; three will receive a placebo. Each of the three groups will receive a different, escalating dose of the investigational vaccine, with the first group enrolled receiving the lowest dose and the third group enrolled receiving the highest dose. Study participants will receive an injection of the VSV-ZEBOV vaccine or placebo at their first scheduled visit and again, at the same dosage level, 28 days later.

      Enrollment at each dosing level is staggered, so interim safety assessments of vaccinated individuals can be conducted before moving to the next dosing level. All study participants will be seen and evaluated by clinical staff 11 times over one year.

      NIH begins early human clinical trial of VSV Ebola vaccine

      While NIAID tests the VSV-ZEBOV vaccine candidate as a prime-boost strategy,  WRAIR is evaluating the investigational vaccine as a single injection. This is being done to evaluate in real time the safety profile of the investigational vaccine when provided at different dosages and compare the immune responses induced by one injection versus two injections. Initial safety and immune response data on the VSV-ZEBOV vaccine are expected by the end of 2014.
      More information about the NIAID clinical trial of the investigational VSV-ZEBOV Ebola vaccine is available at ClinicalTrials.gov using the identifier NCT02257840.

      NIAID conducts and supports research — at NIH, throughout the United States, and worldwide — to study the causes of infectious and immune-mediated diseases, and to develop better means of preventing, diagnosing and treating these illnesses. News releases, fact sheets and other NIAID-related materials are available on the NIAID Web site at http://www.niaid.nih.gov.

      About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.govNIH...Turning Discovery Into Health®

      Read more about ebolaEbola-Freaks

    • Ebola Contact Tracing - how it works

      Contact tracing is finding everyone who comes into direct contact with a sick Ebola patient. Contacts are watched for signs of illness for 21 days from the last day they came in contact with the Ebola patient. If the contact develops a fever or other Ebola symptoms, they are immediately isolated, tested, provided care, and the cycle starts again – all the new patient’s contacts are found and watched for 21 days. Even one missed contact can keep the outbreak going.Ebola-Tracing

      Produced at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), this infographic provides the viewer with a basic understanding of the steps involved in the process known as “contact tracing”, which is a tool implemented by epidemiologists during an outbreak investigation that will help lead investigators to the source of a responsible pathogen, or to whom the pathogenic organism might have been spread.

      Read more on Ebola

    • CDC says to use these disinfectants against Ebola

      Center for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC)
      Interim Guidance for Environmental Infection Control in Hospitals for Ebola Virus

      A man stands at the gate of an Ebola virus treatment center in MonroviaUse a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered hospital disinfectant with a label claim for a non-enveloped virus (e.g., norovirus, rotavirus, adenovirus, poliovirus) to disinfect environmental surfaces in rooms of patients with suspected or confirmed Ebola virus infection. Although there are no products with specific label claims against the Ebola virus, enveloped viruses such as Ebola are susceptible to a broad range of hospital disinfectants used to disinfect hard, non-porous surfaces. In contrast, non-enveloped viruses are more resistant to disinfectants. As a precaution, selection of a disinfectant product with a higher potency than what is normally required for an enveloped virus is being recommended at this time. EPA-registered hospital disinfectants with label claims against non-enveloped viruses (e.g., norovirus, rotavirus, adenovirus, poliovirus) are broadly antiviral and capable of inactivating both enveloped and non-enveloped viruses.

      Frequently Asked Questions
      1. How can I determine whether a particular EPA-registered hospital disinfectant is appropriate for use in the room of a patient with suspected or confirmed Ebola virus infection?

      Begin by looking at the product label or product insert or, if these are not available, search the EPA search engine for this information. Users should be aware that an 'enveloped' or 'non-enveloped virus' designation may not be included on the container label. Instead check the disinfectant's label for at least one of the common non-enveloped viruses (e.g., norovirus, rotavirus, adenovirus, poliovirus).

      SAFETEC SaniZide Plus SaniZideInformation:

      Safetec® SaniZide Plus® Germicidal Solution
      SaniZide Plus® is a convenient, fast-acting, multi-purpose, broad spectrum disinfectant/deodorizer for environmental surfaces. Our alcohol-free formulation is a non-corrosive, EPA registered, quaternary ammonium compound effective against: TB, HIV, Hepatitis A, B, & C, MRSA, CA-MRSA, VISA, VRE, and Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza A. SaniZide Plus® helps you comply with the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, which requires the use of an intermediate level (tuberculocidal) disinfectant where gross contaminations is known to have occurred.

      Test Organism Contact Time:
      *Hepatitis A Virus HAV)...................................................................................10 minutes
      †Hepatitis B Virus HBV).................................................................................... 5 minutes
      ‡Hepatitis C Virus HCV)................................................................................... 5 minutes
      *HIV-1 (associated with AIDS)...........................................................................1 minute
      *Human Coronavirus........................................................................................ 2 minutes
      **Norovirus (Norwalk Virus) ..................................................................... 30 seconds
      *Poliovirus Type 1, strain Brunhilde .........................................................10 minutes
      *SARS Associated Coronavirus (ZeptoMetrix)................................................. 2 minutes
      *Avian Flu A (Strains H9N2 and H3N2)............................................................ 2 minutes
      ***2009 H1N1 Influenza A Virus....................................................................... 2 minutes

      Virucidal Activity
      Test Methods:
      * U.S. E.P.A. Pesticide Assessment Guidelines, Subdivision G: Product Performance, Section 91-2(f), and Section 91-30 (d), (e), November, 1982.
      † Protocols for Testing the Efficacy of Disinfectants against Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) (EPA, Federal Register, Vol. 65, No. 166, 8/25/2000, p. 51828).
      ‡ Protocol for Testing Disinfectants against Hepatitis C Virus using Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus as approved by the U.S. EPA on August 15, 2002.
      **Modified U.S. E.P.A. Pesticide Assessment Guidelines, Subdivision G: Product Performance, Section 91-2(f), and Section 91-30 (d), (e), November, 1982.
      ***Per E.P.A. Guidance Document dated 10/31/09.

      2. Are there special instructions for cleaning and disinfecting the room of a patient with suspected or confirmed Ebola virus infection?

      Daily cleaning and disinfection of hard, non-porous surfaces (e.g., high-touch surfaces such as bed rails and over bed tables, housekeeping surfaces such as floors and counters) should be done.4 Before disinfecting a surface, cleaning should be performed. In contrast to disinfection where products with specific claims are used, any cleaning product can be used for cleaning tasks. Use cleaning and disinfecting products according to label instructions. Check the disinfectant's label for specific instructions for inactivation of any of the non-enveloped viruses (e.g., norovirus, rotavirus, adenovirus, poliovirus) follow label instructions for use of the product that are specific for inactivation of that virus. Use disposable cleaning cloths, mop cloths, and wipes and dispose of these in leak-proof bags. Use a rigid waste receptacle designed to support the bag to help minimize contamination of the bag's exterior.

      3. How should spills of blood or other body substances be managed?

      The basic principles for blood or body substance spill management are outlined in the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Bloodborne Pathogen Standards (29 CFR 1910.1030).5 CDC guidelines recommend removal of bulk spill matter, cleaning the site, and then disinfecting the site.4 For large spills, a chemical disinfectant with sufficient potency is needed to overcome the tendency of proteins in blood and other body substances to neutralize the disinfectant's active ingredient. An EPA-registered hospital disinfectant with label claims for non-enveloped viruses (e.g., norovirus, rotavirus, adenovirus, poliovirus) and instructions for cleaning and decontaminating surfaces or objects soiled with blood or body fluids should be used according to those instructions. READ More at CDC

      Learn more about Ebola:

    • Is Ebola Airborne?

      You've heard the rumors... "Ebola is Airborne"... is it true?

      As of the time of this article - according to both the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO): No.

      You may have received emails, or read "News" claiming that "The CDC and CIDRAP have admitted that Ebola is now airborne." Sorry... we call this a Whole Buncha BULL PUCKY (well, we didn't actually say "Pucky", but it looks better in print this way.)

      Ebola-FreaksOK - we know many of our readers are concerned... and we are getting a huge volume of calls from customers wanting to purchase Ebola Prevention Products and Ebola Protection Kits, but please keep in mind that media will hype anything for ratings and circulation. Social Media will take a rumor or misread a statement, and turn it into "fact". The Ebola Epidemic is bad - let's not contribute to making it sound yet worse. Don't go viral with virus misinformation. At present, the threat of infection in the US is minuscule.

      "Scare-Mongers" are touting vulnerability and trying to build up the threat to vast proportions. True, it is the largest Ebola Outbreak in History. True, over 4,000 have died in Africa. But put this into proportion - this is primarily three countries of a continent so large it could fit the land masses of the US, India, Japan, Mexico, China, Iberia and both Eastern and Western Europe within its borders!

      But are you at risk? Highly improbable at present. Is Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever an Airborne Pathogen? No. Should you take precautions? Maybe... read on:

      Image courtesy of the Economist: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist?fref=photo Image courtesy of the Economist: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist?fref=photo

      The CDC (as of Today) states unequivocally:

      • Ebola is not spread through the air or by water

      WHO states:

      The Ebola virus is transmitted among humans through close and direct physical contact with infected bodily fluids, the most infectious being blood, faeces and vomit.

      The Ebola virus has also been detected in breast milk, urine and semen. In a convalescent male, the virus can persist in semen for at least 70 days; one study suggests persistence for more than 90 days.

      Saliva and tears may also carry some risk. However, the studies implicating these additional bodily fluids were extremely limited in sample size and the science is inconclusive. In studies of saliva, the virus was found most frequently in patients at a severe stage of illness. The whole live virus has never been isolated from sweat.

      The Ebola virus can also be transmitted indirectly, by contact with previously contaminated surfaces and objects. The risk of transmission from these surfaces is low and can be reduced even further by appropriate cleaning and disinfection procedures.

      Not an airborne virus

      Ebola virus disease is not an airborne infection. Airborne spread among humans implies inhalation of an infectious dose of virus from a suspended cloud of small dried droplets.

      Ebola-ScareThis mode of transmission has not been observed during extensive studies of the Ebola virus over several decades.

      Common sense and observation tell us that spread of the virus via coughing or sneezing is rare, if it happens at all. Epidemiological data emerging from the outbreak are not consistent with the pattern of spread seen with airborne viruses, like those that cause measles and chickenpox, or the airborne bacterium that causes tuberculosis.

      Theoretically, wet and bigger droplets from a heavily infected individual, who has respiratory symptoms caused by other conditions or who vomits violently, could transmit the virus – over a short distance – to another nearby person.

      This could happen when virus-laden heavy droplets are directly propelled, by coughing or sneezing (which does not mean airborne transmission) onto the mucus membranes or skin with cuts or abrasions of another person.

      WHO is not aware of any studies that actually document this mode of transmission. On the contrary, good quality studies from previous Ebola outbreaks show that all cases were infected by direct close contact with symptomatic patients.

      No evidence that viral diseases change their mode of transmission

      Moreover, scientists are unaware of any virus that has dramatically changed its mode of transmission. For example, the H5N1 avian influenza virus, which has caused sporadic human cases since 1997, is now endemic in chickens and ducks in large parts of Asia.

      That virus has probably circulated through many billions of birds for at least two decades. Its mode of transmission remains basically unchanged.

      Speculation that Ebola virus disease might mutate into a form that could easily spread among humans through the air is just that: speculation, unsubstantiated by any evidence.

      This kind of speculation is unfounded but understandable as health officials race to catch up with this fast-moving and rapidly evolving outbreak.

      To stop this outbreak, more needs to be done to implement – on a much larger scale – well-known protective and preventive measures. Abundant evidence has documented their effectiveness.

      What are the protective measures recommended by CDC and WHO to avoid the spread of Ebola HF, and more importantly to each of you, to avoid contracting this deadly disease?

      Should you take precautions? Maybe.

      As noted, risk of infection in the US is infinitesimal right now, however... if you may come into contact with an infected person, or enter an area where infection has been present... then be smart. Another consideration is that due to "fear-mongering" as noted above, supplies are likely to run low. We saw this with Swine Flu and Avian Flu Pandemics.. panic set it and gear ran out. People hoarded. If you are concerned that the Ebola HF epidemic may escalate or contagion may spread in your area, then you may want to get some Ebola Protective Supplies now while they are available... most these items have long or indefinite shelf lives, and can always be put to use for other purposes later if unused for the current concern.

      Precautionary Measures for Ebola:

      Ebola is spread through direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes in, for example, the eyes, nose, or mouth) with

      • blood or body fluids (including but not limited to urine, saliva, sweat, feces, vomit, breast milk, and semen) of a person who is sick with Ebola
      • objects (like needles and syringes) that have been contaminated with the virus
      • infected animals
      • Ebola is not spread through the air or by water, or in general, by food. However, in Africa, Ebola may be spread as a result of handling bushmeat (wild animals hunted for food) and contact with infected bats. There is no evidence that mosquitos or other insects can transmit Ebola virus. Only mammals (for example, humans, bats, monkeys, and apes) have shown the ability to become infected with and spread Ebola virus.

      Some Basic Precautions:

      • Practice careful hygiene. For example, wash your hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer and avoid contact with blood and body fluids.
      • Do not handle items that may have come in contact with an infected person’s blood or body fluids (such as clothes, bedding, needles, and medical equipment).
      • Wear protective clothing, including masks, gloves, gowns, and eye protection around anyone infected, or even suspected of infection with Ebola Virus.
      • Avoid funeral or burial rituals that require handling the body of someone who has died from Ebola.
      • Avoid contact with bats and nonhuman primates or blood, fluids, and raw meat prepared from these animals.

      Healthcare providers caring for Ebola patients and the family and friends in close contact with Ebola patients are at the highest risk of getting sick because they may come in contact with infected blood or body fluids of sick patients.

      • Practice proper infection control and sterilization measures.
      • Isolate patients with Ebola from other patients.
      • Avoid direct contact with the bodies of people who have died from Ebola.
      • Notify health officials if you have had direct contact with the blood or body fluids, such as but not limited to, feces, saliva, urine, vomit, and semen of a person who is sick with Ebola. The virus can enter the body through broken skin or unprotected mucous membranes in, for example, the eyes, nose, or mouth

      During outbreaks of Ebola, the disease can spread quickly within healthcare settings (such as a clinic or hospital). Exposure to Ebola can occur in healthcare settings where hospital staff are not wearing appropriate protective equipment, including masks, gowns, and gloves and eye protection.

      Dedicated medical equipment (preferable disposable, when possible) should be used by healthcare personnel providing patient care. Proper cleaning and disposal of instruments, such as needles and syringes, is also important. If instruments are not disposable, they must be sterilized before being used again. Without adequate sterilization of the instruments, virus transmission can continue and amplify an outbreak.

      American Red Cross Germ Guard Personal Protection Packs, N95 Particulate Respirators (N-95 Masks), Procedural Masks, Surgical Masks & Protective Bird Flu Kit.
      Sanizide Plus environmental surface germicidal solution, available in spray bottles and gallon jugs. Proven effective against a wide variety of bacterial and viral pathogens.
      Safetec Personal Antimicrobial Wipes available bulk or boxed - Dispenser canister of SaniZide Plus Germicidal Wipes. Tough microbe killing substances such as Cholroxylenol (PCMX) and Ethyl Alcohol.
      Personal Germicidal Wipes individually wrapped and in dispenser canisters - SaniZide Plus Germicidal Wipes - These pre-saturated, hard surface wipes kill TB, MRSA, VRE, E Coli and more in 10 minutes and HIV-1 in 2 minutes.
      Personal Protection, PPE, Bloodborne Pathogen kits, Bodily Fluid Spill Kits, and BBP kits supplies including Gloves, Bonnets, Face Shields and other bloodborne pathogen cleanup kit items to protect rescuers from Blood and OPIM.
      Disposable Gowns, Disposable Shoe Covers, bonnets, masks and eye shield - designed to protect rescuers attending to causalities or cleaning up bodily fluids and bio-hazardous materials.
      Personal Protection from exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens and Bodily Fluid Spill, Gloves, Disposable Shoe Covers & Masks.
      Sharps Disposal Containers available in 1 Quart and 5 Quart sizes as well as wire and lockable wall brackets for sharps containers. SharpSentinel containers designed to provide cost-effective sharps disposal together with the safety features you require.
      SaniZide solutions and Antiseptic Bio Hand Cleaner Gel available in bottles and sprays. Kills Bacteria and Fights Infections.
      From the American Red Cross Fluid Spill Emergency Responder Pack to Biohazard Scoops, Biohazard Bags, and Disposable Towels - we have the bodily fluid spill clean up products you need.
      Red-Z Fluid Control Solidifiers by Safetec - available in individual packs & Fluid Control Solidifier Shakers.

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