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    Monthly Archives: June 2015

    • Cuts: The Whole Story

      A Novel Product For Bleeding Control

      Prologue

      When you get a cut, your immediate task is to stop the bleeding. Obviously this is of the upmost importance. You look for bandages or gauze or whatever you have on hand. Once the bleeding has stopped, you may think the job is done; you’re in the clear, right? What you don’t always realize is the job of wound management is just beginning. You are about to start on a day’s long journey of managing your wound. What if you re-bleed? What happens if you soak through or get the dressing wet, and how many times could this happen from start to finish? What if germs or bacteria get in the wound? What if the wound gets infected? Most people don’t think of infections until the wound is oozing icky stuff and they have to go to the doctor for antibiotics.  Remember, every time you change wound dressings, you open the wound to infection.

      Chapter 1:  Traditional Wound Dressings

      Ever notice when you put a bandage on certain areas of your body and then you move a certain way, the bandage bows up and you can literally see under it. Most bandages have very little to no adhesive on the sides of that little 1 inch by ¾ of an inch part of the bandage that goes over the wound itself.  I call bandages “Bacteria Tunnels”.

      Not a good barrier!

      STOP WHAT YOU ARE DOING and go get a 3’’x3’’ gauze pad.  Now go to your office window, close one eye and put the gauze pad up to your other eye and look out. What do you see? That’s right, the cars in the parking lot. You can literally see right through it. Some of the cheaper gauze pads may even let you see that your car needs a wash! This is no exaggeration, try it! I call gauze “Germ Screens”.  They keep out the big stuff, pebbles, flies, stray cats.    Not a good barrier!

      Chapter 2: Other Hemostats

      Epistaxis / Bloody Nose Epistaxis / Bloody Nose

      Other hemostats turn to gel when they come in contact with blood. The product label will tell you this forms a “gel-like clot”. Hmmm… is this “gel-like clot” going to hold back blood, especially on a gusher?? Funny… the product labels can be vague about what to do after you form the “gel-like clot”. I would assume though that you leave the gel on, right?

      Scenario: I just cut my hand and have used one of these products. – “OK, I have a gel like clot on the cut on my hand and…  uh-oh, my cell phone is ringing and it’s in my pocket. Oh crap! I smeared off half of the gel like clot and what’s left has pocket lint on it!! Is it ok to get pocket lint on my gel like clot? I guess I better go get a bandage”. See Chapter 1 

      While these types of products may stop bleeding, you still have an open wound that could become infected. You still have to manage the wound until that all important body scab forms to keep blood in and contaminants out. Remember, scabs are nature’s way of protecting wounds and preventing infections.

      QR-2Chapter 3 - WoundSeal 

      Making sure there is blood on a wound, pour WoundSeal on the area and apply light pressure for 30-45 seconds. That is all the time needed to stop the bleeding and form a seal or artificial scab. At that point, your wound management is done! This artificial scab seals blood in and contaminants out. After 1 ½ hours, the seal will have fully hardened and become water-proof so you can bathe. Now, throughout each hour and day, your wound is protected from contaminants. It is SEALED. The true beauty about WoundSeal is that the seal (artificial scab) stays on until your body forms a natural scab, and then it falls of by itself. You have taken wound management from hours or days to under a minute. You have also reduced the risk of infection. Remember, there are other powders that stop bleeding, but none form a seal over the wound that stays in place until you have a natural scab.

      Epilogue

      When it comes to cuts and lacerations, it’s not just about stopping the bleeding. Wound management means stopping the bleeding and assuring the wound does not become infected. The real cost to you isn’t so much the initial treatment but the costs associated with infection. Down time, doctor/hospital cost, medications, etc…

      Remember, all bleeding stops…one way or another.

      Contributed by Nick Wright of Biolife - makers of WoundSeal

      Also Read:

    • Emergency Planning and Evacuation Procedures

      Whether they're man-made or natural, emergencies are always unpredictable. That's why when the alarm goes off in your company facilities, employees must be prepared. To prevent a crisis from becoming a disaster they have to know what to do and how to do it... quickly!

      evacuationYou can make it easy for them... with two emergency preparation training sets of material:

      • Using enhanced content and visuals, we have updated our existing Emergency Planning course to focus even more effectively on the critical role employees play in emergency preparedness.
      • The all-new Emergency Response Plan  program offers employees the practical, hands-on information they need to get out quickly and safely in an emergency.

      When the alarm goes off, it's already too late for those who are unprepared. But you can help minimize damage and save lives... with timely training.

    • How Much Safer is the Construction Industry Today?

      Since the industrial revolution, safety in the construction industry has been the subject of many tragedies, debates, and improvements. Today, as technology improves and job practices are updated, the worksite in America is safer than it has ever been before. But how much safer? To answer this question, let’s take a look back at some of the most notable construction projects in American history as well as statistics before and after the creation of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

      Based on this timeline that calculates the human costs of iconic construction projects around the world, the unimportance of construction safety throughout United States history is very apparent. For example, some of the most deadly projects include the Erie Canal in 1825 with 1,000 fatalities and a death rate of 20 workers per every thousand, the Transcontinental Railroad in 1869 with an estimated 1,200 fatalities and death rate of 80 workers per thousand, and the Hawks Nest Tunnel in 1931 with at least 734 fatalities and an alarming death rate of 152.8 workers per thousand. Even less than 50 years ago, the World Trade Center in 1970 saw 60 of its 3,500 person workforce perish over the course of construction. Based on this timeline that calculates the human costs of iconic construction projects around the world, the unimportance of construction safety throughout United States history is very apparent. For example, some of the most deadly projects include the Erie Canal in 1825 with 1,000 fatalities and a death rate of 20 workers per every thousand, the Transcontinental Railroad in 1869 with an estimated 1,200 fatalities and death rate of 80 workers per thousand, and the Hawks Nest Tunnel in 1931 with at least 734 fatalities and an alarming death rate of 152.8 workers per thousand. Even less than 50 years ago, the World Trade Center in 1970 saw 60 of its 3,500 person workforce perish over the course of construction.
      Bilingual Contractor's First Aid Kits ranging from 10 person kits to 50 person. These kits are appropriate for Construction Worksites and Contractor use to comply with Federal OSHA regulation 1910.151(b), ANSI Z308.1-2009, ANSI Z308-1-2009 as well as Cal/OSHA 3400 section guidelines and Cal/OSHA Title 7, Subchapter 4. Construction Safety Orders §1512. Bilingual Contractor's First Aid Kits ranging from 10 person kits to 50 person. These kits are appropriate for Construction Worksites and Contractor use to comply with Federal OSHA regulation 1910.151(b), ANSI Z308.1-2009, ANSI Z308-1-2009 as well as Cal/OSHA 3400 section guidelines and Cal/OSHA Title 7, Subchapter 4. Construction Safety Orders §1512.

      To put these figures in perspective, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2013 a total of 4,585 people died from fatal workplace injuries, with only 828 coming from construction accidents. Therefore, even though some of these single projects took place over a hundred years ago, they still accounted for more construction deaths than an entire year of all construction in today's day and age! In fact, prior to the creation of OSHA in 1971, an estimated 14,000 workers were killed on the job every year. Since then, OSHA has been responsible for raising safety awareness as well as cutting workplace deaths by 60% and occupational injuries by 40%, even though US employment has almost doubled. Because of this heightened concern for safety in recent years, today our threshold for what constitutes terrible working conditions is much lower. Going back to the timeline, the construction of the Las Vegas CityCenter in 2009, which was dubbed “CityCemetery” by many of its builders, was only responsible for 6 deaths with a death rate of .75 per every thousand. Clearly the human costs that we as a society are comfortable with have changed drastically in a relatively short period of time.

      Although this is a step in the right direction, there is still plenty of work to do. The above statistics only take into account fatalities, and in 2013, there were over 3 million-non fatal workplace related injuries reported that were serious enough to merit days off work or restrict regular duties. Sadly, many of the same hazards that harmed workers in the past still are still very real issues today. For example transportation accidents accounted for 40% of all workplace deaths with both slip and falls and being struck by equipment coming in at 16% each in 2013. Although these types of accidents occur much less frequently, workers in all industries remain at risk from some very basic threats.

      Construction First Aid Compilation Image OSHA requires that adequate first aid supplies
      should be available for employees.

      After reviewing all of the data, it is clear that construction in the United States has become exponentially safer in the past few decades, saving thousands more lives than even 40 years ago. Due in part to the efforts of OSHA and the general improvement of technology, construction worker fatalities are far less frequent than in years past, even with double the workforce. Nevertheless, thousands of workers still face fatal and disabling injuries each year, meaning there is plenty left to achieve in the realm of construction safety in the coming years.

      deathratebar1Rob Tindula writes from DiMarco Araujo Montevideo, a personal injury and workers’ compensation firm in Orange County, California.Since the industrial revolution, safety in the construction industry has been the subject of many tragedies, debates, and improvements. Today, as technology improves and job practices are updated, the worksite in America is safer than it has ever been before. But how much safer? To answer this question, let’s take a look back at some of the most notable construction projects in American history as well as statistics before and after the creation of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

      Based on this timeline that calculates the human costs of iconic construction projects around the world, the unimportance of construction safety throughout United States history is very apparent. For example, some of the most deadly projects include the Erie Canal in 1825 with 1,000 fatalities and a death rate of 20 workers per every thousand, the Transcontinental Railroad in 1869 with an estimated 1,200 fatalities and death rate of 80 workers per thousand, and the Hawks Nest Tunnel in 1931 with at least 734 fatalities and an alarming death rate of 152.8 workers per thousand. Even less than 50 years ago, the World Trade Center in 1970 saw 60 of its 3,500 person workforce perish over the course of construction.

      To put these figures in perspective, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2013 a total of 4,585 people died from fatal workplace injuries, with only 828 coming from construction accidents. Therefore, even though some of these single projects took place over a hundred years ago, they still accounted for more construction deaths than an entire year of all construction in today's day and age! In fact, prior to the creation of OSHA in 1971, an estimated 14,000 workers were killed on the job every year. Since then, OSHA has been responsible for raising safety awareness as well as cutting workplace deaths by 60% and occupational injuries by 40%, even though US employment has almost doubled. Because of this heightened concern for safety in recent years, today our threshold for what constitutes terrible working conditions is much lower. Going back to the timeline, the construction of the Las Vegas CityCenter in 2009, which was dubbed “CityCemetery” by many of its builders, was only responsible for 6 deaths with a death rate of .75 per every thousand. Clearly the human costs that we as a society are comfortable with have changed drastically in a relatively short period of time.

      Although this is a step in the right direction, there is still plenty of work to do. The above statistics only take into account fatalities, and in 2013, there were over 3 million-non fatal workplace related injuries reported that were serious enough to merit days off work or restrict regular duties. Sadly, many of the same hazards that harmed workers in the past still are still very real issues today. For example transportation accidents accounted for 40% of all workplace deaths with both slip and falls and being struck by equipment coming in at 16% each in 2013. Although these types of accidents occur much less frequently, workers in all industries remain at risk from some very basic threats.

      After reviewing all of the data, it is clear that construction in the United States has become exponentially safer in the past few decades, saving thousands more lives than even 40 years ago. Due in part to the efforts of OSHA and the general improvement of technology, construction worker fatalities are far less frequent than in years past, even with double the workforce. Nevertheless, thousands of workers still face fatal and disabling injuries each year, meaning there is plenty left to achieve in the realm of construction safety in the coming years.

      Rob Tindula writes from DiMarco Araujo Montevideo, a personal injury and workers’ compensation firm in Orange County, California.

    • MERS CoV: Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

      • MERSCDC and its partners are closely monitoring a MERS outbreak in the Republic of Korea, the largest known MERS outbreak outside the Arabian Peninsula.
      • MERS is a respiratory illness that has caused fever, cough, and shortness of breath in most people who have the disease.
      • Healthcare providers should evaluate patients suspected to have MERS using CDC’s guidelines and work with health departments to consider testing for patients under investigation.
    • Get OSHA regulations the way you need them!

      OSHA-RegsTimes Change. Needs change, whether you need Federal OSHA / 29 CFR StandardsCal / OSHA Standards, DOT / 49 CFR Standards, or even Maritime or Oil & Gas compliance regulations... you want them the way you want them! In modern business a books may be the solution (and a great fall-back, regardless or your favorite media,) but often CD or Mobile is more readily available when you need it.

      All of our CFR's are published in our easy to read RegLogic® format. This organizes regulations in a way that is easy to navigate, including tabbed subsections and color-coding. Our CD's include a navigation bar and are fully searchable making it a breeze to find the regulation you are looking for. The ability to mark favorites also allow you to find commonly used sections.

      OSHA-Regs-2Don't forget! Free with all of the printed CFR's are easy to access online versions that include our same great RegLogic® formatting for easy navigation. No app download is needed; just go to regs2go.com on your phone, tablet or computer and take all of your regulations with you on the go.

      Go safely forth!

    • Dogs & Cats

      Bowow-dog-first-aid-kit

      Dog & Cat Pet First Aid kits. See our new Cat & Dog Survival Kits 'Dog-Gone-It' & 'Catastrophy' Emergency Kits. Added for you Horse Lovers... Equine First Aid! First Aid & Emergency Kits made especially for your pets. Also read our Pet First Aid Blog
    • Tell those insects to buzz off

      summer-first-aid-sale-banner

      Insect Repellant in Relief Pads & Repellent Pumps. Wasp & Hornet Spray, Bite Relief with Applicator & Repellent Towelette. Ben's Outdoor, DEET, Natrapel with Permathrin - After Bite and more!
    • Pet First Aid

      Spring brought mud indoors with pets, but Summer brings Pet Injuries.

      Practical Pet First Aid for Dogs & Cats - Book Practical Pet First Aid for Dogs & Cats - Book

      Knowing CPR & First Aid are great preparedness for taking care of the family, but don't forget Fluffy, Flicka, and Fido.

      Our four-legged family members have different anatomy than ours... CPR is performed sideways on pets... Hydrogen peroxide is used in Pet First Aid to induce vomiting (to expel poison, generally) not to clean wounds.

      Do you know your Animal First Aid?

      Many local Humane Societies, Animal Shelters and Veterinary Clinics will offer Canine and Feline CPR or First Aid Course... some are even free. If you love your pet, take one. You'll learn some very practical information about giving care to an injured animal - including safety for yourself and others. Often first aid is what will make the difference and emergency veterinary clinics and advanced care are not always right around the corned, and most aren't open 24 hours.

      Pet First Aid Kits - Dog 1st Aid, Cat 1st Aid, Horse Too Pet First Aid Kits - Dog 1st Aid, Cat 1st Aid, Horse Too

      As any course will tell you, you need a good pet first aid kit, too. Be sure your pet first aid kit is appropriate to the type of pet you have, the likely injuries based upon your family lifestyle and location, and make sure there's a great pet first aid guide. Just as with human first aid, you may learn the skills in a class, practice on manikins, and understand the principles, but in an emergency it is vital to have a well written and well organized first aid book to remind you of the proper steps and reassure you that you are giving the best care.

      Reading first aid instructions to you while you tend to an injured pet is a great way to keep children calm, involved, and out of harms way while you care for the family mascot as well.

      pet-emergency-survival-miniLearn more:

    • Snakes

      Always be protected from snakes in the outdoors.  Great for taking on short hikes, camping, or anytime you are in the wilderness. CLICK IMAGE TO LEARN MORE OR PURCHASE! Always be protected from snakes in the outdoors. Great for taking on short hikes, camping, or anytime you are in the wilderness. CLICK IMAGE TO LEARN MORE OR PURCHASE!

      Snakes - a topic that makes many shudder, but a matter of real concern in Summertime.

      Of the approximately 8,000 venomous snake bites in the US each year less than 6 result in fatality.

      Why?

      Preparedness (Snake Bite Kits and First Aid Kits) & Training, couples with advances in Communication and Advanced Medicine.

      Also Read: Animal Bites and Stings

    • Father's Day!

      Hey Dad.. Have a great one! 👔

      Fathers-Day

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