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    Monthly Archives: September 2014

    • America's PrepareAthon 2014: Today is the Day!

      America's PrepareAthon!

      Gwen Camp, FEMA Director of Individual and Community Preparedness welcomes participants to ready.gov/prepare

      America's PrepareAthon! is an opportunity for individuals, organizations, and communities to prepare for specific hazards through drills, group discussions, and exercises.

      National PrepareAthon! Day is September 30, 2014 and will revolve around taking the actions to prepare for these six specific hazards:

      Disaster-Survival-PreparednessCampaign Goals

      The goal of this campaign is to increase the number of individuals who:

      • Understand which disasters could happen in their community
      • Know what to do to be safe and mitigate damage
      • Take action to increase their preparedness
      • Participate in community resilience planning

      What can I do?

      • Register to participate in America’s PrepareAthon! and provide details about the activities you’re planning.
      • Plan your own local community or organizational preparedness event
      • Participate in discussion forums online with like-minded community members
      • Learn the actions to take for disaster preparedness and practice them!

      Where can I find more information?

      AmericasPreparathon

       It is National Preparedness Month! September 2014 is National Preparedness Month - read our National Preparedness Month Blog for Preparedness Tips, Articles, Plans and more!!!

    • Treating a Burn

      Burns suck. They can be one of the most painful - and  are often a deadly - injury. Burns are common, and com in a variety of types and degrees. Knowing First Aid for Burns, and how to treat a burn is essential.

      Care after a Burn

      Care that is immediately given after a burn is referred to as “on-site management.” The first thing that should be done in any burn situation is to remove the patient from harm’s way or heat. Once this has been done, the patient and any helpers on the scene should put out any flames that may be on the patient. After the threat is removed, the burns should be assessed to determine the next step.

      Determine Burn Severity

      Burn_Degree_Diagram-deMuch of what comes next depends on the severity of the burn. If the patient is in a condition that may result in shock or unconsciousness, the patient should be laid down and an ambulance should be summoned. If the patient needs medical assistance, those on scene should immediately call for help, or transport the patient if the burns are on extremities or not as severe. If burns are mild, home remedies may suffice.
      Cool Skin with Water

      In most cases, water can be used to quickly cool the surface temperature of the skin. Cooling the skin with water can alleviate pain, lower the heat, and reduce swelling caused by histamines. This can severely decrease the permanent damage caused by burns. If burns cover 25 percent or more of the skin, however, water should not be used as it can cause the patient’s temperature to drop too fast and could cause hypothermia.
      Prevent Infection

      Covering burns may help to prevent infection. Bandages or dressing should be applied loosely, as tight bandages may tear skin when removed. Food wrap is a clean and sanitary dressing and poses little risk of tearing skin when removed, so it can be a good substitute in the absence of medical bandages. Salves or ointments may help for milder burns, but should not be used for more severe burns.
      Techniques to Avoid

      Certain remedies which were once thought to be helpful in caring for severe burns may actually be detrimental. Rolling on the ground to put out fire can cause unharmed areas of the body to catch fire, so a heavy blanket should actually be used to smother flames. Ice, cold water, and ointments can lower skin temperatures rapidly, putting burn victims at risk for hypothermia if burns cover large areas or are severe. Anything that makes it difficult to examine the wound may also inhibit medical professional’s ability to assess and treat the burn.

      ALSO READ:

      Burn First Aid & Burn Care Products and Supplies: From our Burn First Aid Kits to Burn Sprays, Burn Care Products and S.T.A.R.T Burn Care Unit. We offer Fire Blankets, Water Gel Wraps, Water Gel, Burn Cream & Dressings. 
      Burn Spray in Aerosol or Pump - Antiseptic / Anesthetic Burn Spray, available in Aerosol Burn Spray, and Burn Pump Spray. Our burn spray works immediately to relieve the pain of minor burns, abrasions, scalds - even summer sunburns - while also disinfecting the area.
      Emergency Fire Blanket Kits - Fire Retardant Blanket with and without Vinyl bag. Water Jel Fire Blanket with Canister and Bracket for Mounting.
      American Red Cross Burn Emergency Responder Packs & First Aid Only Deluxe Burn Kits. S.T.A.R.T Burn Unit & BurnAid Burn Blanket Kit. Burn Solutions from WaterJel, North and more.
      Water Jel® Burn Wrap, Water Jel® Heat Shield, BurnAid Pack and Water-Jel Burn Dressings. Brackets for Water Jel Burn Wrap & Burn Wrap, SmartTab EzRefill
      BurnAid Burn Relief & WaterJel Burn Dressings. Burn first aid creams and lotions, gels and ointments for treating first and second degree burns. SmartTab EzRefill Burn care products.

       It is National Preparedness Month! September 2014 is National Preparedness Month - read our National Preparedness Month Blog for Preparedness Tips, Articles, Plans and more!!! GET READY FOR AMERICA'S PREPAREATHON TOMORROW!

    • Today is World Heart Day!

      September 29 is World Heart Day.

      What have you done for your heart Today?

      Your Heart Health Your Heart Health
      • Eat Lean
      • Walk
      • Learn CPR!
      • Get an AED...how about a Grant?

      Read more for your heart:

      CPR & AED AwarenessCPR? Choking? Art? Confusion?, CPR Flash MobSCA Awareness - and of course, with Halloween approaching... how about ZOMBIE CPR?

      CPR Manikins & CPR Supplies, AEDs & AED accessories including AED Trainers & Automatic Defibrillators - see the exciting new Prestan AED trainer and new Prestan CPR Manikin models and AED devices from Phillips, Defibtech, Zoll, Medtronic/Physio-Control, even little HeartSine. CPR / First Aid / AED Videos and CPR Home Learning Kits for students & instructors. Stretchers, Medical Simulators, AED Manikins, Oxygen units, CPR Masks & CPR Kits... Also see Healthcare Training Simulators & FirstAidStore.com™ Featuring First Aid Only® watch our FREE First Aid Video
    • When is Safety Too Much?

      Fostering a Safe Culture - at Home, at School, and in the Workplace... It just makes sense. Some people think government makes safety over-burdensome to the point of restricting free living.

      September-SafetyWe believe that a good safety culture can be fun, free, but sensible. If consideration of safety is instilled in basic thought processes from the beginning: Teach a child when young, incorporating safety thinking (and the reasons why we do things safely) in new workers, etc. - then it becomes second nature and in no way inhibits enjoyment or productivity in the workplace. It enhances both. Accidents and Injuries interfere with fun and work much more than safe rules and procedures.

       It is National Preparedness Month! September 2014 is National Preparedness Month - read our National Preparedness Month Blog for Preparedness Tips, Articles, Plans and more!!!

    • Fall Fireplace Safety

      Be sure you and your family enjoy your fireplace, while also practicing smart fireplace safety. With this helpful guide, you can enjoy your fireplace with peace of mind.
      Fireplace-safety-infographic1. Always have an adult supervise a fire, from the moment it is lit until the ashes are cold. This is the most important part of fireplace safety – a fire should never burn unattended.
      2. Used licensed installers when setting up your fireplace. These professionals will ensure your fireplace is heat-proofed and properly vented.
      3. Use a safety gate. A non-toxic, heat resistant, metal safety gate is the best way to keep your children or pets a safe distance from the fire.
      4. Do not keep a fire alarm in the same room as your fireplace. While it may seem natural to keep a fire alarm nearby, the smoke and heat can trigger false alarms. However, you should keep fire alarms in every sleeping area, as well as at least one on every floor of your home.
      5. Do install a carbon monoxide detector in the same room as your fireplace. Carbon monoxide is a silent danger that has no odor. Installing carbon monoxide detectors in hallways near sleeping areas is also recommended.
      6. Do not clutter the fireplace area. While it may be tempting to decorate your hearth with knick-knacks or other decorations, it is essential to fireplace safety that the area remains free and clear of any decorations, debris, or flammable materials.
      7. Do not mount your television over your fireplace. The heat from the fire can damage your television. Also, such a placement is too high and can result in neck strain.
      8. Before lighting your fire, make sure to open your damper. This is generally done by pulling the handle all the way to the right. Opening your damper ensures that gases are properly vented. To make sure that your damper is fully open, it is recommended to check it with a flashlight.
      9. While your fire is burning, leave the glass doors open. This helps make sure there is enough air available for complete combustion, which helps to keep your chimney free of creosote – a tar that can build up in your chimney, becoming a dangerous fire hazard. You will want to keep a mesh screen in front of your open glass doors, however, to keep embers from escaping.
      10. After your fire is out and the ashes are cool, close the glass doors. This prevents air in the chimney from seeping into your room. You should also close your damper to help keep the cold air out of your home.

      Fire & Emergency Evacuation Gear and Supply - From Fire Axes and Fire Escape Ladders to Barricade “Caution” Tape, Fire Extinguishers, Fire Escape Masks and Kidde Digital Carbon & Fire Alarms - we've got your Emergency and Fire Evacuation Supplies in one easy location and at great prices Fire & Emergency Evacuation Gear and Supply - From Fire Axes and Fire Escape Ladders to Barricade “Caution” Tape, Fire Extinguishers, Fire Escape Masks and Kidde Digital Carbon & Fire Alarms - we've got your Emergency and Fire Evacuation Supplies in one easy location and at great prices

      11. Let your damper handle cool before touching it. It is also recommended to wear an oven mitt while touching the metal handle to help prevent any burns or injuries.
      12. You should only burn dried, cut firewood. Softwood (such as fir and pin) burns more quickly and is better used when beginning a fire. Hardwood (such as maple and oak) is more suited to burning in an established fire, once your chimney is heated. Fallen tree limbs make excellent kindling if they are given the proper amount of time to try.
      13. Never burn flammable liquids, charcoal, soft or moist wood, painted or pressure-treated wood, or trash in your fireplace. The vapors from flammable liquids can explode, charcoal produces carbon monoxide, soft or moist wood encourages more creosote, and trash and painted or pressure-treated wood can release harmful vapors or chemicals.
      14. Make sure to dispose of your ashes properly. Allow your ashes to cool at least overnight before disposing of them in a metal container outside your home. Always moisten the disposed ashes, and never put anything but ashes in the container. Ashes should be hauled away with the rest of your garbage.
      If you follow these simple tips, you’ll enjoy years of safe enjoyment from your fireplace!

       It is National Preparedness Month! September 2014 is National Preparedness Month - read our National Preparedness Month Blog for Preparedness Tips, Articles, Plans and more!!!

    • Baby Safety Month

      Children's Survival Kit Children's Survival Kit

      September is Baby Safety Month, sponsored annually by the Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association (JPMA). JPMA initiated Baby Safety Month more than 20 years ago to educate parents and caregivers on the importance of the safe use and selection of juvenile products.

      Drowning, poisoning, burns and falls are some of the leading causes of child injury. We would like to remind parents of some basic safety rules that can protect babies and toddlers from accidents in the home.

      Drowning: According to the CDC, drowning is the second leading cause of death among 1 to 4 year olds, and the fifth leading cause of accidental death for infants younger than 1 year.

      Never leave your child unattended near water. Leaving your child alone in the tub can have fatal consequences. Children can drown in less than an inch of water, and it can happen in as little as 30 seconds.

      Don’t overfill the tub. Use as little water as possible to minimize risk. If your child can sit up on his or her own, don’t fill the tub more than waist high.

      Fence off your pool. Install an isolation fence with self-closing and self-latching gates.

      Have a lifejacket requirement. Make sure your kids wear life jackets in and around natural bodies of water and in pools for weaker swimmers.

      Learn life-saving skills. Take time to learn Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). When every second counts, knowing CPR can make the difference between life and death.

      Poisoning: Curious young children are constantly putting items in their mouths. More than 1 million children younger than 6 are victims of accidental poisoning each year.

      Here’s what the poison centers want you to know:

      1. If something does happen, you need to have that Poison Help number on hand.  It’s 1-800-222-1222.  Take a minute right now to program it into your phone.  Post the number where it can be clearly seen in an emergency.
      2. Don’t panic!  Most calls to poison centers can be managed over the phone with no lasting effects.  In the rare chance that your child is in imminent danger, the poison center will send for an ambulance and prepare the hospital for what to expect upon arrival.
      3. There really is no question too silly, too small, or too trivial. Unlike 9-1-1, the Poison Help number can be used for questions as well as emergencies, so you don’t need to wonder if it’s OK to call.  It’s OK to call!
      4. Poisons can act fast.  This is not the time to search for answers on the Internet.  Just call 1-800-222-1222.  You will get the right answer the first time from the same experts the doctors call when they have poisoning questions.
      5. Calls are answered immediately any time of day or night and are free and confidential.  The experts on the other end of the line will not judge or chastise you.  They’ll be glad you called. One of the most common experiences people have when calling a poison center is a sense of relief.

      Lock it up. Keep medicine, cleaning products and alcoholic beverages out of reach and out of sight from children.

      Read the label. When giving medicine to children, follow all directions carefully and read all warnings.

      Put up the plants. They may be beautiful, but some plants can be poisonous.

      Know the numbers. Save the nationwide poison control number, 1-800-222-1222 in your cellphone and display it near every telephone in your home. If you think your child has gotten into something dangerous, call 911 immediately.

      Kids First Aid & Child ID Kids First Aid & Child ID

      Kids' First Aid & Child ID Kits

      Ow-Wee-Kit, Child I.D. & Records Mini Kit • Latex Free & Fun MediBag 4 Kidz & Kid Friendly First Aid Kits in FUCOLORS! • FUN BANDAGES... Many themes to suit Kids of all ages (we like them ourselves!) • Also see the great new Diaper Bag Buddy...

      Burns: According to the CDC, every day, more than 300 children under the age of 19 are treated in emergency rooms.

      Bath Safety Tips - Watch that Water! Children are easily burned by higher temperatures. Keeping the bath too hot can burn their skin. Check water temperature. Water can scald in a matter of seconds. Limiting your constant thermostat setting to 120 degrees can help control the water temperature throughout your home and prevent scalding.

      Seasonal Safety - Candles are child burn and fire hazards!  Consider LED lights which burn cool to avoid burns if your child grabs the lights.

      Be armed with alarms. Test your smoke alarms once a month to make sure they are working properly.

      Cook with care. Never leave cooking food unattended on the stove. Restrict children’s use of stoves and ovens.

       It is National Preparedness Month! September 2014 is National Preparedness Month - read our National Preparedness Month Blog for Preparedness Tips, Articles, Plans and more!!!

      Fun child-friendly ice packs, like the Hello Kitty, can make icing a bump or bruise easier. Fun child-friendly ice packs, like the Hello Kitty, can make icing a bump or bruise easier.
    • Fall Sports: Things Every Coach Should Do To Keep Their Football Field Safe For Players

      FootballBy its very nature, football is a dangerous game. It’s a full contact sport played at full speed by some of the strongest, fastest athletes in the world. In nearly every game, players suffer injuries, sometimes minor, other times serious. While there’s nothing that can be done to completely eliminate the risks of playing football, there are some very simple steps coaches can take to keep their players as safe as possible. Perhaps the most important of these is field maintenance.

      Image of Sports First Aid See Sports Medicine and Sports First Aid Supplies

      While everyone knows that a big hit can cause a life-changing injury in an instant, too often, people overlook the more subtle causes of injury. The field itself might not seem all that important to player health, but the fact is there is an inextricable link between the playing surface and player injuries. In fact, one recent study found that college football players suffer knee injuries about 40 percent more often when they play on artificial turf as opposed to grass. But it’s not just a matter of artificial turf vs. grass. Field maintenance is what really matters.
      Make no mistake, a poorly maintained football field is every bit as dangerous to a player as a muscle-bound lineman. That’s why former Houston Texans punter Brett Hartmann recently sued the owners and managers of Reliant Stadium for a devastating ACL injury that occurred when he caught his foot between two pallets of grass on the field. Hartmann alleged that poor field maintenance was to blame, and he pointed to other similar injuries players suffered when playing in the stadium.
      If improper field maintenance can occur at the highest professional level in the sport, it’s safe to say it can happen at colleges, high schools and rec leagues all across the nation. That’s why it’s so important that coaches take a proactive role in field maintenance, not relying solely on the groundskeepers to keep the field in tiptop condition. Coaches are on the field every day, so no one knows the true condition of the field better than they do, and with their help, safer playing surfaces can be created for athletes.
      What can coaches do to ensure better football field maintenance?
      Nobody is asking the coach to hop on a mower and cut the grass on the field. That’s not his job. However, there are some simple things football coaches can do that serve an important purpose in field maintenance, such as:

      • Rotate practice areas to reduce wear: Teams have a habit of practicing in the same area on the field every day. The problem with this is that it leads to serious wear and tear in one area of the field. As the turf quality degrades, it becomes less and less safe for the players, and the field never has a chance to heal. That’s why it’s important for coaches to rotate practice areas on a daily basis. This reduces field damage and gives groundskeeping crews the chance to repair practice areas in a timely manner.
      • Inspect/clean the field before and after every practice: Before every practice starts, coaches and players should inspect the field to make sure there’s no trash or other hazards present. At the end of every practice, coaches and the team should clean up after themselves so that the field remains free of debris. A clean field is a safe field.
      • Communicate issues with the groundskeeping team: Good communication between coaches and groundskeepers is essential to timely field maintenance. Coaches need to communicate field issues immediately to groundskeepers so they can be addressed to prevent them from worsening and posing a hazard to players. Of course, communication is a two-way street, and groundskeepers need to communicate their needs and suggestions to coaches so everyone can do their part to maintain a safer field.

      When it comes to football field maintenance, everyone has a role to play. Coaches who take a proactive role in field maintenance play an important part in keeping their players safe and injury free! Shana Brenner is the Marketing Director of CoverSports’ an athletic manufacturing company that distributes athletic protective covers, sideline tarps and more.

    • Ebola Surge – 2014

      September is National Preparedness Month (read our National Preparedness Month Blog for Preparedness Tips, Articles, Plans and more) - This means we focus on preparing for natural and man-made disasters. But Outbreaks, Pandemics and Epidemics are serious disaster as well... we think you should include preparing to avoid infection in your plans to be properly prepared.

      Read more:

      The 2014 Ebola outbreak is the largest in history and the first Ebola outbreak in West Africa. This outbreak is actually the first Ebola epidemic the world has ever known — affecting multiple countries in and around West Africa. Although the current epidemic does not pose a significant risk to the U.S. public, CDC is taking precautions at home in addition to its activities abroad.

      The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) brings a rare skill to the this daunting public health challenge—nearly 40 years of fighting Ebola outbreaks in Africa. CDC’s elite force of virus hunters on the front lines is supported by specialized public health teams in the field and at the CDC Atlanta headquarters; together, they offer unrelenting help to save lives and protect people. CDC works closely with Ministries of Health and other partners.

      CDC’s unparalleled knowledge of Ebola—how it spreads, how it kills, how to find it, and how to stop it—supports the World Health Organization’s growing West Africa Ebola response. Since July, the United States has escalated its support, with multiple U.S. government agencies joining other domestic and international partners, but more is needed. ebola_950px

      ebola-symptomsCDC’s response to Ebola is the largest international outbreak response in CDC’s history.  Today, CDC has more than 100 disease detectives on the ground in West Africa, supported by hundreds of public health emergency response experts stateside. CDC teams are deployed from the CDC 24/7 Emergency Operations Center (EOC), activated at Level 1, its highest level, because of the significance of this outbreak. Each team is flexibly composed to match talents and expertise with critical needs in country:

      • CDC’s disease detectives find emerging cases to identify contacts and stop further transmission with isolation and improved infection control practices
      • CDC’s lab scientists diagnose Ebola cases and crack Ebola virus DNA codes to map outbreak connections
      • Outbreak control specialists find patterns of spread and population vulnerabilities so scarce resources can be deployed more efficiently
      • CDC’s Ebola outbreak veterans lead with expert guidance to national and international counterparts and new recruits in the Ebola fight
      • Health risk communication specialists fight rumors, stigmatization and unsafe practices in real time
      • Emergency operations teams bring incident management expertise to organize complex efforts.

      Establishing Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs). CDC supports countries establish national and sub-national EOCs. All 3 West African countries at the center of the epidemic now have an Incident Manager, reporting to the President of the country, to lead efforts.

      Strengthening surveillance and epidemiology.  CDC helps countries track the epidemic, including using real-time data to improve real-time response (e.g., identifying the epicenter and tracking the response).

      Improving case finding and contact tracing. CDC strengthens efforts in West Africa to investigate cases and track their contacts. CDC helps interview people who may have been in contact with Ebola patients to see if they have symptoms and monitor them for 21 days. A single missed contact can start another chain of transmission.

      Supporting laboratory networks. CDC is operating and supporting labs in the region to improve diagnosis. CDC is also testing samples from people with suspected Ebola from around the world, and, with Department of Defense support, helped 12 labs around the US gain the capacity to test for Ebola within hours.

      Strengthening health care systems.  CDC leads infection control training for health care workers and safe patient triage throughout the health care system, communities, and households.

      Improving health communication.  CDC health communicators and public health advisors in Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia are working with country embassies, UNICEF, WHO, MSF, other NGOs and Ministries of Health to improve health information.

      Coordinating with partners and facilitating involvement by public health organizations around the world.  CDC is working closely with USAID’s Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance, to support the deployment of a Disaster Assistance Response Team.  CDC is also facilitating assistance by critical organizations such as the African Union, which will mobilize at least 150 staff (including doctors, nurses, epidemiologists and health educators) to support the response.  CDC also works closely with non-governmental organizations on many aspects of the response.

      Advising travelers on how to protect their health and preventing sick travelers from getting on planes. CDC works with airlines, airports, and Ministries of Health to provide technical assistance for exit screening and travel restrictions in affected areas to prevent sick travelers from getting on planes. CDC also works with airlines to address crew and airline staff concerns while ensuring that humanitarian and public health organizations can still travel to affected countries.

      Increasing U.S. preparedness for Ebola. CDC is educating U.S. health care providers to consider Ebola if symptoms are present within 3 weeks of a traveler returning from West Africa; issuing infection control guidance for hospitals to prevent further spread to health care workers and communities; strengthening laboratory networks and existing surveillance systems; and enhancing capabilities at U.S. points of entry.

      Innovating. CDC has confronted Ebola on its home turf since 1976, and each time, CDC’s innovative experts have adapted their tactics to the reality on the ground. CDC is currently involved in ground-breaking activities, such as research on safe, more comfortable personal protective equipment; whole genome sequencing and analysis; monitoring for mutation patterns or changes in transmission; and supporting agencies conducting vaccine trials.

      CDC Foundation. The CDC Foundation is assisting CDC by providing critical assistance and supplies through donations to the Foundation’s Global Disaster Response Fund, which enables CDC staff to respond quickly to changing circumstances and needs.

       

    • Prevent Burn Injury in Children

      We've talked a lot in the past about Burns...

      But what about the risks for Children? Many burn injuries and deaths involve children, so parents and caregivers must be especially diligent to keep children away from situations in which children may cause burns or fires. Making children aware of what can cause burns or fires can be extremely helpful in preventing burn injuries. Going over a safety plan in case of a fire can help save children’s lives.

      Ways to prevent children from causing fires or burn injuries include:

      • Keeping candles, lighters, and matches away from children
      • Keeping pot handles on stove turned in and other hot liquids out of reachkitchen-safety-article
      • Opting for stoves and other appliances that have burn prevention features
      • Keeping electrical appliances away from children
      • Keeping hazardous chemicals out of reach of children
      Burn First Aid & Burn Care Products and Supplies: From our Burn First Aid Kits to Burn Sprays, Burn Care Products and S.T.A.R.T Burn Care Unit. We offer Fire Blankets, Water Gel Wraps, Water Gel, Burn Cream & Dressings. Everything you need to treat burns! 
      Burn Spray in Aerosol or Pump - Antiseptic / Anesthetic Burn Spray, available in Aerosol Burn Spray, and Burn Pump Spray. Our burn spray works immediately to relieve the pain of minor burns, abrasions, scalds - even summer sunburns - while also disinfecting the area.
      Emergency Fire Blanket Kits - Fire Retardant Blanket with and without Vinyl bag. Water Jel Fire Blanket with Canister and Bracket for Mounting.
      American Red Cross Burn Emergency Responder Packs & First Aid Only Deluxe Burn Kits. S.T.A.R.T Burn Unit & BurnAid Burn Blanket Kit. Burn Solutions from WaterJel, North and more.
      Water Jel® Burn Wrap, Water Jel® Heat Shield, BurnAid Pack and Water-Jel Burn Dressings. Brackets for Water Jel Burn Wrap & Burn Wrap, SmartTab EzRefill
      BurnAid Burn Relief & WaterJel Burn Dressings. Burn first aid creams and lotions, gels and ointments for treating first and second degree burns. SmartTab EzRefill Burn care products.

       It is National Preparedness Month! September 2014 is National Preparedness Month - read our National Preparedness Month Blog for Preparedness Tips, Articles, Plans and more!!!

    • ½ Billion Dollars Today and Every Day

      We were at the National Safety Council Conference and Expo last week here in San Diego...fascinating stuff (Except - Really? Just how many types of work gloves can you look at?)

      OSHA Safety Publications OSHA Safety Publications

      Among the many presentations and seminars at the conference, one delved into the topic of workplace "Accidents." (Remember we told you some short while back that the CDC has eliminated this term as most accidents are preventable!)

      At the conference, they said that workplace injuries and fatalities cost our economy $198.2 billion a year. You read that right, 198.2 BILLION dollars a year. That amount of money would allow every kid in America to go to college…and pay their room and board…and buy them a new iPhone 6. In an economy where every penny counts, cutting corners on safety is costing American business owners hundreds of millions of dollars every day.

      OSHA Handbooks & DVDs for OSHA Construction Regulations, OSHA Dictionary & General Industry Regulations (Bilingual). OSHA Compliance Kits, Books, CDs: OSHA 1910 General Industry & OSHA 1926 Construction Industry Including OSHA Log Books, Update Services & Regulations - Federal OSHA 29 / CFR Standards - Helping you protect workers and stay compliant with OSHA mandates. OSHA Compliance Kit OSHA 1910 General Industry OSHA 1926 Construction Industry OSHA llog books OSHA Handbooks & DVDs for OSHA Construction Regulations, OSHA Dictionary & General Industry Regulations (Bilingual). OSHA Compliance Kits, Books, CDs: OSHA 1910 General Industry & OSHA 1926 Construction Industry Including OSHA Log Books, Update Services & Regulations - Federal OSHA 29 / CFR Standards - Helping you protect workers and stay compliant with OSHA mandates. OSHA Compliance Kit OSHA 1910 General Industry OSHA 1926 Construction Industry OSHA llog books

      Workplace deaths are rarely “accidental” – they don’t occur because of chance or randomness.  Instead, they are almost always preventable.  With few exceptions, OSHA investigations find workers were killed as a result of decisions made by employers not to protect them from obvious and well-known dangers. (Avoid the top 10 OSHA violations)

      There are, however, thousands of employers in every industry who have embraced a culture of prevention, where management and workers collaborate in efforts to “find and fix” problems.  Employers who belong to OSHA’s Voluntary Protection Program or Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program for small businesses achieve not just lower injury rates but higher profits as well.

      A well-known example of the link between worker safety and profitability is ALCOA, the large aluminum manufacturer.  Under former CEO Paul O’Neill, the company made safety not only a priority but a prerequisite by committing to a goal of zero injuries.  By managing for workplace safety, O’Neill improved the quality of the company’s products and made ALCOA one of the most profitable enterprises in the country.

      Employers that invest in workplace safety and health can expect to reduce fatalities, injuries, and illnesses. This will result in significant cost savings, including lowering workers’ compensation costs and medical expenses, avoiding OSHA penalties and eliminating the need to hire and train replacement employees. For these reasons, employers often find that changes made to improve workplace safety and health result in significant improvements to their organization’s productivity and financial performance.

      Workplace safety is not only the right thing to do for your workers; it’s the right thing to do for your business.

      DVDs and VHS videos available for American EHS & Medical Association materials. Spanish/English Bilingual VHS & DVD. Newest CPR, AED & First Aid Guidelines. Also, CAL/OSHA Standards, DOT/49 CFR Standards, Federal OSHA, Forklift Safety, Over 80 OSHA Safety Training Topics, Eye Safety, First Aid, Accident Prevention, Bloodborne Pathogen videos and many more. Safety Compliance Kits, Regulatory Compliance Packs, Safety Posters+ 
      American Environmental Health & Safety offers in-depth, fully comprehensive training materials and programs for all your training needs. Students will get the full experience. Videos, DVDs, Student & Instructor MaterialsFirstAidStore.com™ Featuring First Aid Only® watch our FREE First Aid Video Online!
      OSHA Handbooks & DVDs for OSHA Construction Regulations, OSHA Dictionary & General Industry Regulations (Bilingual). OSHA Compliance Kits, Books, CDs: OSHA 1910 General Industry & OSHA 1926 Construction Industry Including OSHA Log Books, Update Services & Regulations - Federal OSHA 29 / CFR Standards - Helping you protect workers and stay compliant with OSHA mandates. OSHA Compliance Kit OSHA 1910 General Industry OSHA 1926 Construction Industry OSHA llog books
      AMA First Aid Guide Handbook and the SmartTab EzRefill AMA First Aid Handbook in individual Booklets.
      Forklift Safety information for Forklift Construction, General Industry & Compliance Kits in Spanish and English.
      Cal / OSHA Handbooks & DVDs for Industry Safety, Construction Safety, OSHA Compliance & Electrical / General Safety. Cal / OSHA - General Industry & Construction Industry - OSHA 300 Logs & More
      Maritime OSHA regulations, will help keep you in compliance with the latest safety and health regulations affecting longshoring, shipyard employment, and marine terminals.
      Survival Book and DVD, Disaster Preparedness Video and the Mountain Road Warrior Emergency Kit.
      Help your company in the oil and gas industry protect its workers and stay compliant with OSHA mandates.
      DOT DVDs/VHS for Federal Motor Carriers, 49 CFR Hazardous Material Regulations, DOT Compliance & Compliance Kits.
      OSHA Safety Training keeps your company compliant with OSHA Standards and offers training in every category of work.
      Help protect your workers against fall-related accidents and stay compliant with OSHA.

       It is National Preparedness Month! September 2014 is National Preparedness Month - read our National Preparedness Month Blog for Preparedness Tips, Articles, Plans and more!!!

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