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    Monthly Archives: May 2014

    • Hurricane Preparedness

      Today is the last day of National Hurricane Preparedness Week.

      This past week we've shared:

      Do you feel more prepared? Are you ready for a cyclone, tropical storm or Hurricane? Tomorrow is the "official" start of Atlantic Hurricane Season and we've had some doozies over the past couple of years, so please get your plan together and prepare!

      NHC Senior Hurricane Specialist Stacy Stewart discusses the life-saving action to take before, during and after the storm.

      Get your Gear on - Prepare for Disaster! Get your Gear on - Prepare for Disaster!

      History teaches that a lack of hurricane awareness and preparation are common threads among all major hurricane disasters. By knowing your vulnerability and what actions you should take, you can reduce the effects of a hurricane disaster.

      Hurricane hazards come in many forms, including storm surge, heavy rainfall, inland flooding, high winds, tornadoes, and rip currents. The National Weather Service is responsible for protecting life and property through issuance of timely watches and warnings, but it is essential that your family be ready before a storm approaches. Furthermore, mariners should be aware of special safety precautions when confronted with a hurricane.

      Download the Tropical Cyclone Preparedness Guide (PDF) or follow the links for more information. But remember, this is only a guide. The first and most important thing anyone should do when facing a hurricane threat is to use common sense.

      National Hurricane Preparedness Week 2014

      Survival Gear for Businesses and Preparedness Products for Home & Auto Survival Gear for Businesses and Preparedness Products for Home & Auto
    • What is your Hurricane Preparedness Plan?

      We're nearing the end of National Hurricane Preparedness Week, and the beginning of the 2014 Hurricane Season is just around the corner - is your Hurricane Plan complete?

      According to NOAA - Hurricane Season Dates for 2014:

      Hurricane season in the Atlantic begins June 1st and ends November 30th. The Eastern Pacific hurricane season begins May 15th and also ends November 30th.

      Hurricane Season Summaries and Reports

      Atlantic: Monthly Tropical Cyclone Summary | Tropical Cyclone Reports
      Eastern Pacific: Monthly Tropical Cyclone Summary | Tropical Cyclone Reports

      FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate explains the importance of having a hurricane plan.

      American-Red-Cross-Emergency-Kits

      Hurricanes can cause loss of life and catastrophic damage to property along
      coastlines and can extend several hundred miles inland. The extent of damage
      varies according to the size and wind intensity of the storm, the amount and
      duration of rainfall, the path of the storm, and other factors such as the number
      and type of buildings in the area, the terrain, and soil conditions. The effects
      include the following:
      • Death or injury to people and animals;
      • Damage or destruction of buildings and other structures;
      • Disruption of transportation, gas, power, communications, and other services;
      • Coastal flooding from heavy rains and storm surge; and
      • Inland flooding from heavy rains.  
      Get your Gear on - Prepare for Disaster! Get your Gear on - Prepare for Disaster!

      Store supplies so you can grab them quickly if you need to evacuate; know in advance what else you will need to take.

      Take time now to make a list of the things you would need or want to take with you if you had to leave your home quickly.
      Store the basic emergency supplies in a “Go Bag” or other container. Be ready to
      grab other essential items quickly before leaving. Remember to include specialized
      items for people with disabilities and others with access and functional needs, such
      as older adults, children, and those with Limited English Proficiency.
      When making your list, consider the Five Ps of Evacuation
      PEOPLE
      • People and, if safely
      • possible, pets and
      • other animals or
      • livestock
      PRESCRIPTIONS
      • Prescriptions, with
      • dosages; medicines;
      • medical equipment;
      • batteries or power
      • cords; eyeglasses;
      • and hearing aids
      PAPERS
      • Papers, including
      • important documents
      • (hard copies and/or
      • electronic copies
      • saved on external
      • hard drives or portable
      • thumb drives)
      PERSONAL NEEDS
      • Personal needs—such as
      • clothes, food, water, first aid kit,
      • cash, phones, and chargers—
      • and items for people with
      • disabilities and others with
      • access and/or functional needs,
      • such as older adults, children,
      • and those with Limited English
      • Proficiency
      PRICELESS ITEMS
      • Priceless items, including
      • pictures, irreplaceable
      • mementos, and other
      • valuables
      How to Prepare for a Hurricane DOWNLOAD THE FREE GUIDE! How to Prepare for a Hurricane

      Store supplies you will need to live at home with no power.

      Even if you are
      in an area that was not asked to evacuate, you may still lose power and the water
      supply to your home. Depending on the strength of the hurricane and its impact on
      your community, you could be in your home with no power or other basic services
      for several weeks. Think about items you require for this situation. Keep these
      supplies on hand in your home. For a full list of supplies for your emergency
      supply kit.
      Here are some suggestions to consider:
      • Flashlight and radio, either hand-cranked or battery-powered, with extra batteries;
      • At least 1 gallon of water per person per day for at least 3 days. A normally active
      • person needs about three-quarters of fluid daily, from water and other beverages.
      • Water is also needed for food preparation and sanitation;
      • At least a 3-day supply of non-perishable food for members of your household,
      • including pet food and considerations for special dietary needs. Include a non-
      • electric can opener for canned food;
      • First aid kit, medications, and medical supplies; and
      • Battery backup power for power-dependent mobility devices, oxygen, and other
      • assistive technology needs.
      • Sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person, if you live in a cold-weather climate.
      Survival Gear! Wouldn't you like to be a Prepper too?
      Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car.
      Are you Ready? 
      Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time.
      Check your Emergency Supplies:

      • Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries)
      • Count your stock... is it enough?
      • Don't let your gas tank get below half-full
      • Keep cash on hand - ATMs may not be available, and you cannot count on credit cards in an emergency.
      • Think Ahead-Plan Wisely-Prepare Yourself to Survive!

      Survival Gear Including: Survival Kits, C.E.R.T. Products and gear, Pet Emergency Kits/Supplies, Outdoor Supplies, Triage Units, Trauma Kits, Search & Rescue Equipment & Disaster and Survival Videos, Emergency Shelters, Lighting, Food & Heating.

    • ¿Cuáles son los pasos para prepararse para un huracán?

      Dado que los desastres naturales pueden ser extremadamente peligrosos y graves, es vital estar muy bien preparados.

      Por favor siga los consejos importantes que los CDC ofrecen para prepararse para un huracán. Estos consejos incluyen:

      #Preparación2014 - ¿Está Listo?  Chasque. #Preparación2014 - ¿Está Listo? Chasque.

      Además de estos consejos, puede encontrar más información en el sitio web de los CDC sobre huracanes.

      Los CDC recomiendan en forma especial que imprima toda información importante antes de la llegada del huracán. Los cortes de luz durante y después del huracán pueden impedir el acceso a la información electrónica cuando más la necesita. Si se prepara ahora podrá mantenerse seguro usted y su familia.

      También, puede recibir consejos semanales de los CDC durante la temporada de huracanes subscribiéndose a los siguientes servicios:

      Es importante que uno este preparado para todo tipo de emergencias y posibles evacuaciones. Si vive en zonas costeras que incluyen Florida, Texas y Carolina del norte es importante que se prepare para huracanes. Aquí podrá leer sobre los suministros necesarios y como diseñar un plan de emergencia adecuado.

      Los huracanes son tormentas agresivas que se conocen por sus fuertes vientos y lluvia. Algunos lugares de los Estados Unidos son particularmente susceptibles a los huracanes, incluyendo las zonas costeras, como el sureste de Florida, la costa del Golfo del sur de Texas y el área de la región externa de los bancos de Carolina del Norte. Dado que los desastres naturales pueden ser extremadamente peligrosos y graves, es vital estar muy bien preparados. MAS

    • Predicting the next Super Storm, Cyclone or Hurricane

    • Hurricanes - Just a coastal issue? No.

      1164587_high_voltageDuring Hurricane Preparedness Week, many coastal residents take heed and prepare to batten down the hatches - but Hurricanes cause serious harm inland as well.

      Don't be lead into a false sense of security thinking that by living away from the coast you are immune to the ravages of Hurricanes and Tropical Storms.

      ALSO SEE:

      Don't Drown, Turn Around and Flood Week

      Heavy Rainfall & Inland Flooding

      Hurricane Frances Rainfall - Hydrologic Prediction Center, NOAA Hurricane Frances Rainfall - Weather Prediction Center, NOAA

      Tropical cyclones often produce widespread, torrential rains in excess of 6 inches, which may result in deadly and destructive floods. In fact, flooding is the major threat from tropical cyclones for people living inland. Flash flooding, defined as a rapid rise in water levels, can occur quickly due to intense rainfall. Longer term flooding on rivers and streams can persist for several days after the storm. When approaching water on a roadway, always remember Turn Around Don't Drown.

      Rainfall amounts are not directly related to the strength of tropical cyclones but rather to the speed and size of the storm, as well as the geography of the area. Slower moving and larger storms produce more rainfall. In addition, mountainous terrain enhances rainfall from a tropical cyclone.

      Hurricane Flooding: A Deadly Inland Danger

      Think Inland Flooding Hurricane Floyd Courtesy of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, J. Jordan

      In the last 30 years, inland flooding has been responsible for more than half the deaths associated with tropical cyclones in the United States.Ed Rappaport, National Hurricane Center

      Consider the following:

      "When it comes to hurricanes, wind speeds do not tell the whole story. Hurricanes produce storm surges, tornadoes, and often the most deadly of all -- inland flooding." While storm surge is always a potential threat, more people have died from inland flooding in the last 30 years. Intense rainfall is not directly related to the wind speed of tropical cyclones. In fact, some of the greatest rainfall amounts occur from weaker storms that drift slowly or stall over an area.

      Picture of Inland Flooding from Hurricane Floyd Hurricane Floyd Courtesy of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, J. Jordan

      Inland flooding can be a major threat to communities hundreds of miles from the coast as intense rain falls from these huge tropical air masses.

      The United States has a significant hurricane problem. More than 60% of our Nation’s population live in coastal states from Maine to Texas, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico.

      Hurricane Floyd (1999) brought intense rains and record flooding to the Eastern U.S. Of the 56 people who perished, 50 drowned due to inland flooding.

      Satellite image of Hurricane Floyd Hurricane Floyd Courtesy of NASA/GSFC

      Tropical Storm Alberto (1994) drifted over the Southeast United States and produced torrential rainfall. More than 21 inches of rain fell at Americus, Georgia. Thirty-three people drowned. Damages exceeded $750 million.

      Tropical Storm Claudette (1979) brought 45 inches of rain to an area near Alvin, Texas, contributing to more than $600 million in damages.

      Hurricane Agnes (1972) produced floods in the Northeast United States which contributed to 122 deaths and $6.4 billion in damages. Long after the winds from Hurricane Diane (1955) subsided, the storm brought inland flooding to Pennsylvania, New York, and New England contributing to nearly 200 deaths and $4.2 billion in damages.

      So, the next time you hear hurricane -- think inland flooding!

      What can you do?

      • When you hear hurricane, think inland flooding.
      • Determine whether you live in a potential flood zone.
      • If advised to evacuate, do so immediately.
      • Keep abreast of road conditions through the news media.
      • Move to a safe area before access is cut off by flood water.
      • Do not attempt to cross flowing water. As little as six inches of water may cause you to lose control of your vehicle...two feet of water will carry most cars away.
      • Develop a flood emergency action plan with your community leaders.

      NHC Hurricane Specialist John Cangialosi discusses the deadly danger of inland flooding caused by tropical cyclones.

      For more information contact:
      National Weather Service
      Office of Climate, Water and Weather Services
      1325 East-West Highway
      Silver Spring, MD 20910

      Learn more about rainfall from the NWS Weather Prediction Center.

      Survival Gear! Wouldn't you like to be a Prepper too?
      Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car.
      Are you Ready? 
      Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time.
      Check your Emergency Supplies:

      • Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries)
      • Count your stock... is it enough?
      • Don't let your gas tank get below half-full
      • Keep cash on hand - ATMs may not be available, and you cannot count on credit cards in an emergency.
      • Think Ahead-Plan Wisely-Prepare Yourself to Survive!

      Survival Gear Including: Survival Kits, C.E.R.T. Products and gear, Pet Emergency Kits/Supplies, Outdoor Supplies, Triage Units, Trauma Kits, Search & Rescue Equipment & Disaster and Survival Videos, Emergency Shelters, Lighting, Food & Heating.

    • Temporada de huracanes

      La temporada de huracanes en el Atlántico se extiende desde el 1 de junio hasta el 30 de noviembre de cada año.stlouisstorm

      Aunque usted no puede detener una tormenta o huracán, hay varias cosas que puede hacer antes para prepararse. Haga un plan familiar y tenga los suministros de emergencia necesarios. Lea más sobre la protección de personas mayores y mascotas en caso de un huracán.

      suministros para los equipos de emergencia suministros para los equipos de emergencia

      Más información (en inglés y español)

      Los CDC trabajan a toda hora para salvar vidas y proteger al público contra amenazas a la salud, con el fin de mejorar la seguridad de la nación. Los CDC, una agencia federal de los EE. UU., utilizan la ciencia y la prevención para facilitar la toma de decisiones saludables. Los CDC buscan ayudar a que las personas tengan una vida más larga, productiva y saludable.

    • Hurricane Winds

      During each day of National Hurricane Preparedness Week, we will share a different aspect of hurricane safety, preparedness and survival.

      Today some background on hurricane winds...

      Tropical storm-force winds are strong enough to be dangerous to those caught in them. For this reason, emergency managers plan on having their evacuations complete and their personnel sheltered before the onset of tropical storm-force winds, not hurricane-force winds.

      Hurricane‐force winds, 74 mph or more, can destroy buildings and mobile homes. Debris, such as signs, roofing material, siding and small items left outside become flying missiles during hurricanes. Winds can stay above hurricane strength well inland. In 2004, Hurricane Charley made landfall at Punta Gorda on the southwest Florida coast and produced major damage well inland across central Florida with gusts of more than 100 mph.

      Atlantic and Eastern Pacific hurricanes are classified into five categories according to the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale, which estimates potential property damage according to the hurricane's sustained wind speed.

      The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale is a 1 to 5 rating based on a hurricane's sustained wind speed. This scale estimates potential property damage. Hurricanes reaching Category 3 and higher are considered major hurricanes because of their potential for significant loss of life and damage. Category 1 and 2 storms are still dangerous, however, and require preventative measures. In the western North Pacific, the term "super typhoon" is used for tropical cyclones with sustained winds exceeding 150 mph.

      Category Sustained Winds Types of Damage Due to Hurricane Winds
      1 74-95 mph
      64-82 kt
      119-153 km/h
      Very dangerous winds will produce some damage: Well-constructed frame homes could have damage to roof, shingles, vinyl siding and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly rooted trees may be toppled. Extensive damage to power lines and poles likely will result in power outages that could last a few to several days.
      2 96-110 mph
      83-95 kt
      154-177 km/h
      Extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage: Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Many shallowly rooted trees will be snapped or uprooted and block numerous roads. Near-total power loss is expected with outages that could last from several days to weeks.
      3
      (major)
      111-129 mph
      96-112 kt
      178-208 km/h
      Devastating damage will occur: Well-built framed homes may incur major damage or removal of roof decking and gable ends. Many trees will be snapped or uprooted, blocking numerous roads. Electricity and water will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes.
      4
      (major)
      130-156 mph
      113-136 kt
      209-251 km/h
      Catastrophic damage will occur: Well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the roof structure and/or some exterior walls. Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and power poles downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.
      5
      (major)
      157 mph or higher
      137 kt or higher
      252 km/h or higher
      Catastrophic damage will occur: A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

      NHC Hurricane Specialist Eric Blake discusses the winds associated with tropical cyclones, and the importance of having a NOAA Weather Radio.

      Survival Gear for Businesses and Preparedness Products for Home & Auto Survival Gear for Businesses and Preparedness Products for Home & Auto
    • Storm Surge - Hurricane Preparedness Week #HurricanePrep!

    • Happy Memorial Day

      MOMENT OF SILENCE

      amflagwav


      Pay tribute to the U.S. men and women who died during military service. Please observe a minute of silence at 3:00 p.m., local time.

      John A. Logan
      Civil War Commander in Chief John A. Logan declared the first official Memorial Day in 1868
      The First Official Memorial Day
      May 30, 1868 

      Do you celebrate Memorial Day? In 1868, Commander in Chief John A. Logan of the grand Army of the Republic issued what was called General Order Number 11, designating May 30 as a memorial day. He declared it to be "for the purpose of strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village, and hamlet churchyard in the land." Where do you suppose that first Memorial Day took place? The first national celebration of Memorial Day (originally Decoration Day) took place May 30, 1868, at Arlington National Cemetery. The national observance of Memorial Day still takes place there today, with the placing of a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the decoration of each grave with a small American flag. The holiday has changed a bit since it first began, which some argue was even earlier than Logan's dedication. Southern women decorated the graves of soldiers even before the end of the Civil War. After the war, a women's memorial association in Columbus, Mississippi, put flowers on the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers in 1866, an act of generosity that inspired the poem by Francis Miles Finch, "The Blue and the Grey," published in theAtlantic Monthly. In 1971, federal law changed the observance of the holiday to the last Monday in May and extended it to honor all those who died in American wars. People pay tribute not only with flowers but also with speeches and parades. Whom do you honor on Memorial Day? 

      Memorial Day weekend is the unofficial start of summer. Whether you’re travelling or enjoying a backyard
      barbecue, the Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation offers some tips for a safe and healthy holiday
      weekend:
      1. Food Safety
      • Wash hands thoroughly with soap and warm water before handling food and after handling raw poultry
      or meat. To guard against cross-contamination of bacteria, keep uncooked meats away from other foods.
      • Cook foods thoroughly, especially ground beef, poultry, and pork.
      • Refrigerate all perishable food within two hours.
      2. Fire Safety
      • When using a grill, be sure to clean it thoroughly to remove any grease or dust. Check for gas leaks. Use
      the grill outside, not in a garage, porch, or other enclosed space.
      • If you plan to use a fire pit, be sure to put out fire completely before leaving it unattended.
      • Do not park your vehicle on grass as the hot exhaust can easily ignite dry vegetation.
      3. Water Safety
      • Don’t swim alone.
      • Wear a life vest while boating.
      • Supervise children at all times in and near the water.
      4. Sun Safety
      • Use sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher. Apply it generously throughout the day.
      • Wear a hat and sunglasses.
      • Drink lots of water to stay hydrated.
      5. Travel Safety
      • Don’t drink and drive or travel with anyone who has been drinking.
      • Wear your seatbelt at all times.
      • Make sure your vehicle has been serviced before a long road trip.
      • Familiarize yourself with your surroundings and know where the nearest emergency room is in case of an
      emergency.
      Enjoy the holiday weekend with friends and family! And, remember to pay your respects to those who have given
      so much so that we can enjoy the liberties we have today.

      Memorial Day Weekend

      • Image of Swimming Pool & Lifeguard First Aid Kit This swimming pool and lifeguard first aid kit has everything you'll need around the pool and more – even a whistle for warnings and calling for help! Use the products in this first aid kit for fun in the sun and around the water - protection and treatment for insect bites, minor cuts, scrapes and eye irritations. In addition, our lifeguard kits provide a CPR one-way valve face shield to protect rescuers from contaminants when performing CPR. Products are contained in a strong metal case with gasket for protection from weather and moisture around the swimming pool

        Barbecue Food Safety  – Simple guidelines for grilling food safely

      • Boating Safety  – Learn from the U.S. Coast Guard how to prevent accidents, injuries, and fatalities while boating.
      • Recipes from and for Americans  – Healthy recipes, collections and publications, kids' recipes, cooking for a crowd...
      • Swimming Safety  – Before you jump in, make sure you know the facts about water safety.
      • Travel Safety  – Airline status, airport screening, foreign travel advisories, citizens abroad...
    • STRYVE: Prevención de la violencia juvenil

      Según los datos más recientes disponibles, aproximadamente el 20 por ciento de los alumnos de escuelas secundarias denunció haber sido intimidados en la escuela y más del 30 por ciento admisión haber presenciado alguna pelea.

      La violencia juvenil se puede prevenir.  STRYVE es una iniciativa nacional para prevenir violencia antes de que empieze. Ármese con las herramientas necesarias para prevenir la violencia juvenil.

      http://www.cdc.gov/spanish/especialesCDC/ViolenciaJuvenil/

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